CfP: Global War, Global Connections, Global Moments, Zurich, 2018

A century after the First World War, this conference wants to reflect on international relations and entanglements during the global conflict. The aim is to bring together an international group of scholars working on transnational and international fields and aspects of the war, such as diplomacy, rivalry between war partners, secret diplomacy or commemoration.

Core topics:
– International Relations
– Cooperation and Rivalry between War Partners
– Alliances
– Networks, NGOs, Red Cross, Transnational companies
– Visions of Post-War Future, Peace and Order
– Transition from War to Peace (Global War, Local Peace)
– Global War – Global Actors – Local Actors
– Commemoration (transnational)
– Revolutions, Ruptures and Turning Points
– Knowledge transfer, secret diplomacy and intelligence services

Confirmed keynote speakers are Prof. Dr. Maartje Abbenhuis (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and Prof. Dr. Fischer-Tiné (ETH Zurich, Switzerland).

Please send an abstract of 300 – 400 words until 10th November 2017 to the following email: global.war.conference@gmail.com.

Organized by Thomas Schmutz (University of Zurich/Newcastle) and Gwendal Piégais (Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest).

Programme
Part of the conference is also a workshop for PhD students and early career scholars.

CFP: War and Imprisonment, May 2018, New York

The capture and confinement of human beings has been—and remains—a central feature of warfare and periods of mass violence both within and between nation-states and among non-state actors. Prisoners apprehended and held during times of conflict—whether military or political—have been both blessing and curse to their keepers. While often valued as cheap labor and lucrative bargaining chips, the high costs—economic, social, political, and environmental—associated with mass imprisonment continue to challenge even the best organized bureaucratic states. This conference seeks to explore these historical and contemporary dynamics across geographic time and space. We welcome interdisciplinary scholarship on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

Prisoner of war camps
Prison towns
Civilian prisoners in wartime
Political imprisonment
Prison culture
Prison violence
Treatment of prisoners
Prison labor in wartime
Race, class, gender, and prison in wartime
Prison architecture and design
Environmental impacts of mass imprisonment

The one-day conference will be held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, located at 365 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, on Friday, May 11, 2018. We envision a program free of geographical, chronological, or methodological restraints.

Individual paper proposals of no more than 300 words and a short CV should be sent to Clarence (Jeff) Hall (chall@qcc.cuny.edu) and Sarah Danielsson (sdanielsson@gc.cuny.edu) no later than December 15, 2017. Accepted presenters will be notified in early 2018. Interested presenters may also be considered for publication in an anthology tentatively scheduled for 2019.

CfP: Echoes of revolution 1848, 1918. Revolution, nationalism, and socialism

Weekend conference: ‘Echoes of revolution 1848, 1918. Revolution, nationalism, and socialism’
Dates: Saturday and Sunday, 17 and 18 February 2018
Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

As the old European powers approached exhaustion in the Great War, a wave of revolutionary struggles broke out across the continent, from Ireland to Russia. Mass movements articulated class, social and national aspirations as states fragmented and empires, dynasties and rulers were toppled. But relations between these movements and their component parts were anything but simple. National claimants contested for control of disputed territories in the name of self-determination. Class and social movements struggled with one another over who should rule in the successor states, and in whose interests. These struggles left a lasting legacy which helped shape European politics for decades.

As a pivotal year in European history, 1918 begs comparison with other pivotal years, in particular 1848, in which many similar social and national aspirations came to the fore. This conference will look at and compare movements for radical social and political change of those revolutionary years. We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words to be presented at the conference on any aspects of revolution, nationalism and socialism anywhere around the world during, around or across the years 1848 and 1918. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Francis King. E-mail: f.king@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 15 December 2017

Call for Reviewers: Global Military Studies Review

In January 2018, Simon Fraser University Press will launch the open access review journal Global Military Studies Review. The purpose of this new tri-annual publication format is to provide an overview of the newest publications in the broad field of Military Studies (History, IR, Political Science, Security Studies, etc.)

We therefore ask interested reviewers to send us a short statement of interest to review for this new journal and up to three fields of interest. A current list of titles available for review will also be provided on request.

Feel free to contact the editors for any further information: FJacob@qcc.cuny.edu or jhorncas@sfu.ca

Global Military Studies Review

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, British Columbia
Canada V5A 1S6

Editors:
Dr. James Horncastle (Simon Fraser University)
Dr. Frank Jacob (Queensborough Community College, CUNY)

CfP: The Paris Peace Conference and the Challenge of a New World Order, Paris, June 2019

The Peace Conference held in Paris in the aftermath of the Great War remains among the most important yet also most controversial events in modern history. Although it is often considered to have made a second global war all but inevitable, it has also been praised for providing the basis for an enduring peace that was squandered recklessly by poor international leadership during the 1930s.

A major international conference will take place in Paris in June 2019 to commemorate the centenary of the 1919 Conference from a global perspective. The purpose of this event is to re-examine the history of the Peace Conference through a thematic focus on the different approaches to order in world politics in the aftermath of the First World War. A remarkably wide range of actors in Paris – from political leaders, soldiers and diplomats to colonial nationalist envoys and trade unionists, economists, women’s associations and ordinary citizens – produced a wide array of proposals for a future international and, indeed, global order. These proposals were often based on vastly different understandings of world politics. They went beyond the articulation of specific national security interests to make claims about the construction and maintenance of peace and the need for new norms and new institutions to achieve this aim. To what extent the treaties and their subsequent implementation represented a coherent world order remains a question of debate.

Full details here.

Paper proposals
The conference organisers aim to ensure the conference provides a global perspective on the Paris Peace Conference. We are therefore particularly keen to receive proposals from scholars working on topics pertaining to the non-western world.

The conference languages will be English and French
Regardless of language, all proposals will receive serious consideration.

The deadline for proposals is: 1 June 2018
Please send your proposal (abstract in English or French of no more than 500 words) and short CV to Axel Dröber: ADroeber@dhi-paris.fr.

RAI / GLGW and Pembroke College Graduate Scholarship on World War One

Featured

One scholarship (2018-2021) is available for applicants who are ordinarily resident in the UK/EU/European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland and who are applying to a D.Phil. in History, specialising in the First World War.

The scholarship will provide at least £18,000 per annum to cover course fees, college fees and a grant for living costs. Awards are made for the full duration of fee liability for the course. The scholarship is funded by the Rothermere American Institute (RAI) in association with the Faculty of History’s Globalising and Localising the Great War (GLGW) programme and Pembroke College, and is made possible thanks to a generous donation from the Rothermere Foundation.

The scholarship will be known as the Captain Hon. Harold Alfred Vyvyan St. George Harmsworth Graduate Scholarship on World War One.

The holder of the scholarship will be part of the RAI’s and GLGW’s community of scholars, working alongside leading academics and graduate students exploring various aspects of the First World War and the United States in the early 20th century.

We wish to encourage applications for proposed doctoral theses to be based in the History Faculty that focus wholly or in part on the United States and the genesis or implications of the First World War. The time period can encompass the long durée of 1900-1930.

Downloadable advert: Harmsworth Graduate Scholarship advert final
Application – via University application form for graduate study by 12 noon UK time (midday) on Friday 19 January 2018.

For more information on The RAI’s American History page, visit http://www.rai.ox.ac.uk/oxcrush
For more information on Pembroke College, visit http://www.pmb.ox.ac.uk/
For more information on the Faculty of History, visit http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/home
For more information on GLGW, visit http://greatwar.history.ox.ac.uk/
For information on the History Faculty graduate admissions, visit http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/graduate-admissions
To apply, visit the University of Oxford Application Guide: https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1

CfP: Marianne in War and Peace, 1913-1923. The French Republic in the era of the Great War

‘Marianne in War and Peace, 1913-1923. The French Republic in the era of the Great War’. A special issue of French History

The study of the First World War continues to thrive as the centennial commemorations of the conflict draw to a close. In large part, the current vitality of First World War studies stems from the cultural and comparative turns taken by the historiography since the 1980s. Anxious to dispense with national paradigms to interrogate the broader and transnational currency of the wartime systems of representations, historians of the Great War often elected to focus on the cultural dimensions of the conflict. Historians of France played and continue to play a critical role in the renewal of this field (Hanna & Horne, 2016; Smith, 2016).

In France itself, a long-lasting controversy over the existence and significance of a “culture de guerre” has framed the analysis of wartime mobilization as an alternative between consent and coercion. In 1998, this important debate about the respective importance of patriotic mobilization and state-enforced discipline degenerated into a full-blown academic dispute. Two decades on, it still simmers and occasionally boils over to the detriment of scholars and scholarship alike.

This controversy has reinforced the domestic outlook of the historiographical debate in France and accounts, partly at least, for its limited engagement with foreign historiographies. Likewise, French historians have relatively neglected the colonial and imperial dimensions of the conflict. Most significantly, the debate is often artificially framed as an opposition between cultural and social historians. As a result, our understanding of the politics of wartime mobilization and demobilization remains fragmented, despite the rejuvenation and dynamism of French political history as a whole.

This guest-edited special issue of French History sets out to address this problem. It aims to showcase innovative perspectives on the French experience of the First World War. It will focus on the political dimensions of military operations and on the contested process of social and cultural mobilization. It will also consider how France and the French came to terms with the fraught process of demobilization, and dealt with the multifaceted legacies of the conflict across the country and its empire.

Proposals should be submitted in the first instance to Pierre Purseigle (p.purseigle@warwick.ac.uk). They should include the proposed title of the article, its summary (500 words max.), and a one-page C.V. The deadline for submission of the proposals is 15 November 2017. Full manuscripts of selected articles (8-10,000 words max.) will be due by 1 February 2018.

Please note that each selected article will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the journal’s editorial procedure. The decision to publish will rest with French History’s editorial team.

References:
M. Hanna and J. Horne, ‘France and the Great War on Its Centenary’, French Historical Studies, 39: 2, April 2016, pp. 233–259
L. V. Smith, ‘France, the Great War, and the “Return to Experience”’, The Journal of Modern History, 88: 2, June 2016, pp.380–415.