New publications: Literature & the Great War. Toby Garfitt, Oxford & Nicolas Bianchi, Montpellier

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature (STTCL) (http://newprairiepress.org/sttcl/) is committed to publishing high quality, anonymously peer reviewed articles written in English on post-1900 literature in French, German, and Spanish. All issues are available online.

Recently published special issue: 41.2 (Summer 2017): Writing 1914-1918. National Responses to the Great War. “From the National Context to its Margins: When the World Used Literature to Respond to the Great War”.

Guest Editors: Toby Garfitt & Nicolas Bianchi

Articles on Canada and Argentina as well as France, Germany and Britain. Full table of contents available here.

By shedding light on some original responses to the Great War that are today hardly known, and by asking the same questions of many works written in contexts which were radically different, this STTCL special issue advocates for a genuinely comparative approach to this literature. Born in a context of nationalist withdrawal, these cultural objects also had a paradoxically wide circulation (due to early translations, commentaries, literary reactions, and so on), which is why study of these apparently isolated writers is so valuable.

 

Writing the Great War / Comment écrire la Grande Guerre?
Francophone and Anglophone Poetics / Poétiques francophones et anglophones
Edited by Nicolas Bianchi and Toby Garfitt

Series: Romanticism and after in France / Le Romantisme et après en France, Vol. 27
Series Editor: Patrick McGuinness

Peter Lang, Oxford, 2017. XIV, 366 pp.. ISBN: 978-1-78707-198-8 (print)
Available to purchase in ePDF and ePUB formats here.

For France the First World War, or Great War, was a war of national self-defence, but for Britain it was not. Does that mean that French literary treatments of this unimaginably destructive war were very different from British ones? Not necessarily – but much can be learned from considering both traditions side by side, something that is rarely done.

The essays collected in this bilingual volume, by a range of scholars working on literature and history on both sides of the Channel, show that while the wider purposes of the war are striking for their absence in both French and British traditions, there are many common strands: realistic narratives of the trenches, humour as a safety-valve, imagination and creativity. Yet there are differences, too: for instance, there is plenty of French poetry about the war, but no real equivalent of the British «war poets». The volume looks at iconic figures like Owen, Brooke, Barbusse, Apollinaire and Proust, but also at a number of lesser known writers, and includes a study of «poetry of colour», recognising the active contribution of some four million non-Europeans to the war effort. The book includes a preface by the eminent war historian Sir Hew Strachan.

Engagée dans une guerre défensive sur ses frontières, la France connut une Grande Guerre bien différente de celle avec laquelle composèrent ses alliés britanniques. Faut-il en conclure que les deux nations furent amenées à produire des réponses au conflit radicalement différentes? Peut-on dégager des traditions nationales ou des tendances transnationales ouvrant la voie à des comparaisons encore rarement esquissées par la critique littéraire? C’est le pari des contributions de ce volume bilingue, réunissant autour de la question: «comment écrire la Grande Guerre?», les articles de spécialistes francophones et anglophones des domaines historique et littéraire. Il montre la variété des thématiques partagées par les deux traditions littéraires: récits réalistes des tranchées, usage de l’humour comme d’un exutoire salutaire, imagination et créativité; et souligne la présence de différences notables, comme l’absence de mythification en France de la poésie de 14, pourtant elle-aussi produite en masse tout au long de la guerre. L’ouvrage, tout en donnant une place de choix aux écrivains de premier ordre (Owen, Brooke, Barbusse, Apollinaire ou Proust), tente d’offrir quelque visibilité à un certain nombre d’auteurs moins connus, au nombre desquels des auteurs de couleur, à qui leur contribution à l’effort de guerre n’aura pas valu la reconnaissance littéraire attendue. La préface a été rédigée par Sir Hew Strachan, grand spécialiste de l’histoire de la période.

Nicolas Bianchi is a normalien and agrégé de lettres modernes, teaching at Université Montpellier III.
Toby Garfitt is Fellow and Tutor in French at Magdalen College, Oxford.

Study day: T E Lawrence, the British Armed Forces & the First World War in the Middle East

The Oxford Changing Character of War Programme & the Society for Army Historical Research
10 July, 1pm – 5.30pm – Pembroke College, Oxford

Speakers include: Dr John Peaty, Dr Neil Faulkner, Gp Capt John Alexander, Maj Dr Paul Knight and CCW Director, Dr Rob Johnson.

The event is open to all, but registration is required: http://www.ccw.ox.ac.uk/events/2017/7/10/t-e-lawrence-the-fall-of-aqaba-global-war
There will be a small fee for non-students, but students will be able to attend free of charge. Please note that lunch is not provided, although there will be some light refreshment.

Further information here.

Event: The First World War and the Americas: from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego

The National Archives is hosting a conference on the Americas, which will address the impact of the conflict across the length and breadth of the two continents.

Speakers will discuss the conflict experiences of those living far from the battlefield, including war enthusiasm, loss and the longer term impact on memory and national identity. They will also consider some of the other ways in which the conflict affected the Americas, notably through trade and economic development. In doing so the event will explore some of the war’s untold stories far away from the Western Front and highlight why it was a truly global conflict.

PROGRAMME
Sat 1 July 2017, 09:30 – 17:00
The National Archives
Bessant Drive
Richmond
TW9 4DU

9:30 Registration, tea and coffee

9:45 Introduction

10:00 Keynote lecture
Prof Ian Beckett, University of Kent
‘1917: Year of Decision’

11:00 Break

11:15 Session 1: ‘Associated Powers’
Dr Sam Edwards, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘The Great War and the Great Republic: the American Experience of the First World War’

Dr Rory Miller, University of Liverpool
‘War, Business and Uncertainty in South America: A Bumpy Ride on the Periphery’

12:30 Lunch

13:30 Session 2: ‘Empire’
Dr Bonnie J. White, Memorial University of Newfoundland
‘‘Sorrow, Gratitude, and Pride’: Newfoundland’s Cultural Memory of the Great War’

Dr Kent Fedorowich, UWE Bristol
‘‘The True North Strong and Free’? Canada’s War at Home, 1914-1919’

Dr Richard Smith, Goldsmiths, University of London
‘‘That our national and allied hopes be speedily realized’: West Indian war experiences and aspirations during 1917′

15:00 Break

15:30 Round Table

16:00 Wine Reception

Cost: £24-£30. Purchase tickets here.

CFP: 1917: Revolution, Resistance and Radicalism in the Atlantic World

Extended Deadline Call for Papers for the 18th Annual International Graduate Student Conference on Transatlantic History

“1917: Revolution, Radicalism and Resistance in the Atlantic World”

Submission Deadline: July 31
Conference Dates: October 19-21, 2017
Keynote Speakers: Dr. Erik S. McDuffie and Dr. Julia L. Mickenberg
Where: University of Texas at Arlington

The theme for this year’s conference is the impact of the Russian Revolution of 1917 on the Atlantic World, examining the political, social, cultural, and economic reverberations and legacies prompted by the collapse of Russia’s ancient regime and the consolidation of Soviet/Bolshevik power. Inspiring hope and terror abroad, this conference aims to analyze the various transnational and international dimensions of the Russian Revolutions and how they shaped social and political movements in the Atlantic World, both directly and by virtue of establishing a new geopolitical context.

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Revolutions and uprisings of 1917-1923 (Russia, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Mexico, Greece, Ireland, Egypt, etc.)
Communist, socialist, and anarchist internationalism
Imperialism/colonialism, anti-colonial movements, and decolonization
Transatlantic solidarity struggles
Women’s and feminist movements
Radical and social movement networks
Anti-war and peace activism during World War I and World War II
Refugees and exiles
Social, political, and cultural forms of anti-communism – both left- and right- wing
Fascism and anti-fascism
Cold War Studies

We invite papers and panel submissions that are historical, geographical, anthropological, literary, sociological, and cartographic in nature–including interdisciplinary and digital humanities projects–that fall within the scope of transatlantic studies from both graduate students and young scholars.

We also seek to explore and further establish shared terminology, methodologies, and defining parameters as they pertain to the field of transatlantic history. This conference has become an interdisciplinary and intercontinental meeting place where such ideas can converge into a common conversation. Therefore, we also welcome papers on:

Twentieth-century empires
Transatlantic networks
Making of nation-states
Transnational spaces
Transatlantic migrations
Diaspora studies
Collective memory
Identity construction
Transatlantic cuisine and consumption
Intercultural transfer and transfer studies
Transnational families
Cartographic history

Selected participants’ papers will be considered for publication in Traversea, the peer-reviewed, online, open-access journal in transatlantic history.

Submission of individual paper abstracts should be approximately three hundred words in length and should be accompanied by an abbreviated (one page) CV. Panel proposals (3-4 people) should include titles and abstracts of panels as a whole, as well as each individual paper. Deadline for submission is July 31, 2017. We will notify authors of accepted papers by August 15, 2017.

Paper and panel submissions should be made at https://form.jotform.us/70865303289159

Please direct all questions to Lydia Towns at lydia.towns@mavs.uta.edu
Contact Info: Lydia Towns, Transatlantic History Doctoral Program at the University of Texas at Arlington

Oxford University’s ‘Lest We Forget’ crowd-funding WW1 campaign now live

On 5 June, the University of Oxford launched the ‘Lest We Forget’ project aimed at saving and preserving material owned by the public related to WW1. They are seeking to raise £40-80k in one month (5 June – 5 July 2017) in order to train and support local volunteers around the UK to run digital collection days to try to capture all the WW1 material (diaries, letters, objects, etc) currently held by the public and in danger of being lost. The material brought in by the public will the be digitized and uploaded to a freely available web site to be launched on 11th November 2018.

Please help spread the word about this project and donate by going to:
https://oxreach.hubbub.net/p/lestweforget/

For more information see: https://www.facebook.com/OxfordLWF/”
See also: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/57658-lest-we-forget

CFP: Medical History of WWI

Proposals Deadline: 10 November 2017

Over 22-25 March 2018, the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences will be co-sponsoring a conference on the medical history of WWI.

It will be hosted at the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School in San Antonio, Texas.

Presentations on all facets of medicine and healthcare related to the war are welcome, to include: historical understandings of military medicine as practiced by all participants and in all geographic regions; consideration of the repercussions of the war on the practice of medicine; medicine in various campaigns; effects on the home fronts; postwar medical issues; mental health issues; the pandemic influenza; and related topics.

Presentations should be 30 minutes long, and two-paper panels are welcome.

As with the 2012 conference, we anticipate publication of selected papers.

Contact: Dr Sanders Marble, Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage, william.s.marble.civ@mail.mil

Blog: Revisiting the 1917 Stockholm Peace Conference: Indian Nationalism, International Socialism, and Anti-Imperialism

A recent blog by Ole Birk Laursen on the University of Exeter’s Global and Imperial Forum discusses how the centenaries of the Russian revolutions (1917) and the end of the First World War (1918), are connected through the abandoned Stockholm Peace Conference and, given their anti-imperialist narratives, how they impacted the colonial world. Despite the attendance of Indians, Egyptians, Persians and Turks in Stockholm, the scant historical inquiries into this might-have-been moment tend to neglect how such anti-imperial ambitions were tied to world peace.

Ole Birk Laursen (Research Affiliate, the Open University) is a historian of Black and South Asian people in Britain and Europe with a particular focus anti-imperialism and anarchism. In addition to book chapters and journal articles on Indian nationalism, his book The Indian Revolutionary Movement in Europe, 1905-1918 is forthcoming with Liverpool University Press (2019).