Study day: T E Lawrence, the British Armed Forces & the First World War in the Middle East

The Oxford Changing Character of War Programme & the Society for Army Historical Research
10 July, 1pm – 5.30pm – Pembroke College, Oxford

Speakers include: Dr John Peaty, Dr Neil Faulkner, Gp Capt John Alexander, Maj Dr Paul Knight and CCW Director, Dr Rob Johnson.

The event is open to all, but registration is required: http://www.ccw.ox.ac.uk/events/2017/7/10/t-e-lawrence-the-fall-of-aqaba-global-war
There will be a small fee for non-students, but students will be able to attend free of charge. Please note that lunch is not provided, although there will be some light refreshment.

Further information here.

Event: The First World War and the Americas: from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego

The National Archives is hosting a conference on the Americas, which will address the impact of the conflict across the length and breadth of the two continents.

Speakers will discuss the conflict experiences of those living far from the battlefield, including war enthusiasm, loss and the longer term impact on memory and national identity. They will also consider some of the other ways in which the conflict affected the Americas, notably through trade and economic development. In doing so the event will explore some of the war’s untold stories far away from the Western Front and highlight why it was a truly global conflict.

PROGRAMME
Sat 1 July 2017, 09:30 – 17:00
The National Archives
Bessant Drive
Richmond
TW9 4DU

9:30 Registration, tea and coffee

9:45 Introduction

10:00 Keynote lecture
Prof Ian Beckett, University of Kent
‘1917: Year of Decision’

11:00 Break

11:15 Session 1: ‘Associated Powers’
Dr Sam Edwards, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘The Great War and the Great Republic: the American Experience of the First World War’

Dr Rory Miller, University of Liverpool
‘War, Business and Uncertainty in South America: A Bumpy Ride on the Periphery’

12:30 Lunch

13:30 Session 2: ‘Empire’
Dr Bonnie J. White, Memorial University of Newfoundland
‘‘Sorrow, Gratitude, and Pride’: Newfoundland’s Cultural Memory of the Great War’

Dr Kent Fedorowich, UWE Bristol
‘‘The True North Strong and Free’? Canada’s War at Home, 1914-1919’

Dr Richard Smith, Goldsmiths, University of London
‘‘That our national and allied hopes be speedily realized’: West Indian war experiences and aspirations during 1917′

15:00 Break

15:30 Round Table

16:00 Wine Reception

Cost: £24-£30. Purchase tickets here.

CfP: Captivity in War: a Global Perspective (19th and 20th Centuries)

This conference will explore various issues relating to captivity in war in the 19th and 20th centuries. In recent years, the study of prisoners of war has increasingly attracted scholarly attention. However, it remains a neglected topic when it comes to research on wars, which often focuses either on the conduct of war itself or on the home front, with prisoners of war fitting in neither of those categories. The aim of the conference is to bring together academics currently working on various aspects of captivity in war during the 19th and 20th centuries, and to discuss and explain how captivity in war varied and evolved during this period.

We welcome proposals for 15-minute papers from researchers not only with a historical background, but also from other disciplines. Submissions from postgraduate and early career researchers are particularly welcomed. We purposely use a broad definition of «captives», which not only refers to prisoners of war but also includes forced labourers, civilian internees etc. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

International organisations and humanitarian aid
Violence towards captives
Captives and labour
Interaction with local populations
Release and reintegration

The conference will be held at the University of Bern, Switzerland on 23/24 March 2018 and is organised by the Military Academy at ETH Zurich.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words and a brief CV to: marcel.berni@vtg.admin.ch and tamara.braun@vtg.admin.ch by 15 September 2017.

Bursaries to cover travel expenses and accommodation are available.

We aim to publish selected contributions in a special edition of the peer-reviewed International Journal of Military History and Historiography.
Contact Email: marcel.berni@vtg.admin.ch

CFP: 1917: Revolution, Resistance and Radicalism in the Atlantic World

Extended Deadline Call for Papers for the 18th Annual International Graduate Student Conference on Transatlantic History

“1917: Revolution, Radicalism and Resistance in the Atlantic World”

Submission Deadline: July 31
Conference Dates: October 19-21, 2017
Keynote Speakers: Dr. Erik S. McDuffie and Dr. Julia L. Mickenberg
Where: University of Texas at Arlington

The theme for this year’s conference is the impact of the Russian Revolution of 1917 on the Atlantic World, examining the political, social, cultural, and economic reverberations and legacies prompted by the collapse of Russia’s ancient regime and the consolidation of Soviet/Bolshevik power. Inspiring hope and terror abroad, this conference aims to analyze the various transnational and international dimensions of the Russian Revolutions and how they shaped social and political movements in the Atlantic World, both directly and by virtue of establishing a new geopolitical context.

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Revolutions and uprisings of 1917-1923 (Russia, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Mexico, Greece, Ireland, Egypt, etc.)
Communist, socialist, and anarchist internationalism
Imperialism/colonialism, anti-colonial movements, and decolonization
Transatlantic solidarity struggles
Women’s and feminist movements
Radical and social movement networks
Anti-war and peace activism during World War I and World War II
Refugees and exiles
Social, political, and cultural forms of anti-communism – both left- and right- wing
Fascism and anti-fascism
Cold War Studies

We invite papers and panel submissions that are historical, geographical, anthropological, literary, sociological, and cartographic in nature–including interdisciplinary and digital humanities projects–that fall within the scope of transatlantic studies from both graduate students and young scholars.

We also seek to explore and further establish shared terminology, methodologies, and defining parameters as they pertain to the field of transatlantic history. This conference has become an interdisciplinary and intercontinental meeting place where such ideas can converge into a common conversation. Therefore, we also welcome papers on:

Twentieth-century empires
Transatlantic networks
Making of nation-states
Transnational spaces
Transatlantic migrations
Diaspora studies
Collective memory
Identity construction
Transatlantic cuisine and consumption
Intercultural transfer and transfer studies
Transnational families
Cartographic history

Selected participants’ papers will be considered for publication in Traversea, the peer-reviewed, online, open-access journal in transatlantic history.

Submission of individual paper abstracts should be approximately three hundred words in length and should be accompanied by an abbreviated (one page) CV. Panel proposals (3-4 people) should include titles and abstracts of panels as a whole, as well as each individual paper. Deadline for submission is July 31, 2017. We will notify authors of accepted papers by August 15, 2017.

Paper and panel submissions should be made at https://form.jotform.us/70865303289159

Please direct all questions to Lydia Towns at lydia.towns@mavs.uta.edu
Contact Info: Lydia Towns, Transatlantic History Doctoral Program at the University of Texas at Arlington

Event: War, Health, and Humanitarianism, 16 June 2017, Weston Library, Oxford

16th June 2017, 11am-5.30pm
Lecture Theatre, Weston Library, Oxford OX1 3BG

‘War, Health and Humanitarianism’ brings together historians studying conflicts from the medieval period to the modern world in order to discuss the potential impact of historical research on present day policy.
Convened by Dr Rosemary Wall (University of Hull, and Sassoon Visiting Fellow at the Bodleian Libraries)

Programme: War-Health-and-Humanitarianism_Programme

Register: http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/whatson/whats-on/upcoming-events/2017/jun/war-health-humanitarianism
Free event but limited places so registration is essential

With thanks for support from the Society for the Social History of Medicine, All Souls College and the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford

Oxford University’s ‘Lest We Forget’ crowd-funding WW1 campaign now live

On 5 June, the University of Oxford launched the ‘Lest We Forget’ project aimed at saving and preserving material owned by the public related to WW1. They are seeking to raise £40-80k in one month (5 June – 5 July 2017) in order to train and support local volunteers around the UK to run digital collection days to try to capture all the WW1 material (diaries, letters, objects, etc) currently held by the public and in danger of being lost. The material brought in by the public will the be digitized and uploaded to a freely available web site to be launched on 11th November 2018.

Please help spread the word about this project and donate by going to:
https://oxreach.hubbub.net/p/lestweforget/

For more information see: https://www.facebook.com/OxfordLWF/”
See also: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/57658-lest-we-forget

Workshop: Veteran Dialogue and the Future of War, Pembroke College, 13 & 14 June 2017

The Changing Character of War (CCW) programme, Pembroke College Oxford, is hosting a two day workshop on the 13th and 14th of June on the themes of veteran civilian dialogue and the future of warfare.

Location: Harold Lee Room, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW

This event is a two-day, panel-based workshop, devoted to the two themes of veteran/civilian dialogue and the future of warfare. The purpose of this workshop is to engage a broad audience of civilians, military personnel, academics and non-academics alike and encourage them to think more deeply about their moral relationship to these important and timely themes. The veteran dialogue portion of the workshop will focus on such broad themes as: soldier recruitment and the making of soldiers, the ethical experience of war, what we think society owes to veterans, veteran healthcare and compensation, moral injury, PTSD, spouse and family issues, and civil-military relations. The future of war portion of the workshop will focus on such broad themes as: emerging technologies such as fully autonomous weapons, soldier enhancement, surveillance and meta-data; counter-terrorism and institutional reform, the ‘individualization’ of war, war and poverty, and emerging conceptual frameworks for military tactics and strategy.

Further information on the workshop and booking via Eventbrite here.

There is an evening event at 7pm on 13 June, which people are invited to, even if they cannot attend the workshop. Further information here and download poster: Veteran Poster- Is War the Health of the State