CfP: Commemoration, Memory, Archive, Sussex University, 4 & 5 Sept. 2018

COMMEMORATION, MEMORY, ARCHIVE
Investigating commemorative and memorial uses of personal, non-professional images in the digital age in the Global South
Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, University of Sussex
4th and 5th September 2018

The commemorative and memorial use of personal, private images in the context of large-scale violence and death has a long history. Private images have been continually employed to access worlds that no longer exist, to de-anonymize, individualize or humanize victims, to identify murderers and the murdered, to evidence contested events and to prove the existence of life before death. They populate archives, memorials and museums, places of public protest and, increasingly, myriad regions of the internet.

We invite contributions to both the roundtable discussions and more traditional conference papers. Please note that the aim of the roundtables is to generate and facilitate a broad exchange of knowledge and ideas and to nurture collaboration. Consequently, as selected roundtable members you will be asked to participate in the discussion from the perspective of your research expertise rather than present a traditional conference/practice paper.

Full details here.

Roundtable Participation
If you would like to participate in the Roundtable discussions please send a 300-word expression of interest with a brief biography to Piotr Cieplak on imageandcommemoration@gmail.com by 9th July 2018.

Abstracts should include: a) a brief overview of how your research or practice work fits into the remit of the roundtables b) three key points you would like to include for consideration and discussion among other participants.

Traditional Papers
If you would like to submit a more traditional, 20-minute paper on any of the themes covered by the roundtables above please send an abstract of 300 words and a brief biography to Piotr Cieplak on imageandcommemoration@gmail.com by 9th July 2018.

We are particularly interested in hearing from early career researchers but abstracts from people at all stages of their career are welcome.

There will be dedicated networking time to further future collaborations.

CfP: The First World War in Italy and Beyond: History, Legacy and Memory (1918–2018)

30 November – 1 December 2018
Italian Institute of Culture, London

Annual Conference of the Association for the Study of Modern Italy

Download CfP: CFP – ASMI 2018

The conference will explore the history, legacy and memory of the First World War in Italy from 1918 to 2018. As the War was one of the formative experiences of the modern Italian nation, the aim is to place the conflict in a longer chronological perspective and to highlight its lasting impact from a range of viewpoints. Drawing on recent innovations in the historiography, the conference will shift focus away from the battlefields towards hitherto neglected areas of study, including the experience of civilians and everyday life, the transition from war to peace, and the post-war climate and reconstruction. It will shed light on how the memory of WWI shaped Italy’s national identity and served political ends during the Fascist period and after the Second World War. The intention is also to escape the confines of national historiography by placing Italy in comparative and transnational contexts. Thus, the centenary presents an opportunity to look with fresh eyes at the mark left by the War on the history, politics and society of Italy.

We welcome proposals from scholars working in a variety of disciplines including history, literature, film, politics, anthropology, art, economics, sociology and geography.

Panels might include, but are not limited to:
• The immediate aftermath of WW1 (1918–1922) and the rise of social conflict, political violence and Fascism
• The creation of the League of Nations and the emergence of pacifism, humanitarianism and internationalism
• The experience of veterans in the post-war period
• New historiographical approaches to the study of Italy and WW1
• Global, transnational and comparative perspectives
• Local, regional and national experiences
• Gender, both femininity and masculinity
• Family and societal ties
• Changes to ideas of nationhood, democracy, citizenship and community after WW1
• The legacy of WWI under Fascism
• Parallels between the aftermath of WW1 and the aftermath of WW2
• The material heritage of the War: monuments, memorials and cemeteries
• Italy’s commemorations of the centenary in national or transnational contexts

The organizers welcome proposals for individual papers and for panels composed of 3 speakers. They reserve the right to break up and re-structure proposed panels.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Prof. Gunda Barth-Scalmani (University of Innsbruck)
Author of numerous works on Italian-Austrian relations and the experiences of women during WWI, including Ein Krieg – Zwei Schützengräben, Österreich – Italien und der Erste Weltkrieg in den Dolomiten 1915–1918 (Bozen 2005) and Militärische und zivile Kriegserfahrungen 1914–1918 (Innsbruck, 2010).

Dr. Marco Mondini (University of Padua/Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento)
Author of numerous bestselling books on Italy and WW1, including most recently Il Capo. La Grande Guerra del generale Luigi Cadorna (Il Mulino 2017) and La guerra italiana. Partire, raccontare, tornare 1914-18 (Il Mulino 2014). He is a frequent contributor to programmes on Rai Storia, e.g. http://www.raistoria.rai.it/articoli/cadorna-il-capo/32462/default.aspx

Please send an abstract of max. 250 words and a short biography to: asmi.conference1918@gmail.com
Abstracts can be both in English and in Italian.
The closing date for receipt of abstracts is 1 June 2018

Accepted speakers will be required to join ASMI, which includes subscription to the journal Modern Italy.

Organising Committee: Selena Daly (University College Dublin), Carlotta Ferrara degli Uberti (University College London), Hannah Malone (Freie Universität Berlin), Martina Salvante (University of Warwick)

CfP: Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, Reconciliation

Postgraduate and ECR Conference
Saturday 26 May 2018, 9am-5pm
TORCH, Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG

Keynote Speaker: Professor Marita Sturken
(Professor of Media, Culture and Communication, New York University)

This one-day interdisciplinary conference is the culmination of the Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, Reconciliation. Over the course of the 2017-18 academic year, the Series has brought together academics, creative practitioners, field-workers and policy-makers to explore textual, monumental and aural commemoration and its role in reconciliation and peace-building. This conference provides an unprecedented opportunity for graduates to contribute to and profit from the Series’ findings. Postgraduate students and early career researchers from all disciplines are invited to share their original research in a conference interested in the purpose, practice, significance and consequences of commemorative acts which respond to and emerge from armed conflict. We are particularly interested in what the future of commemorative practice might look like, and how new technologies and social media are changing the ways in which people remember and heal.

We welcome theoretical and methodological diversity, including critical reflections, and qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Possible topics for presentations include, but are not limited to:

– Textual, monumental and/or aural modes of commemoration
– Digital forms of commemoration
– The future of post-war commemoration, including digital commemoration
– The politics of post-war commemoration
– Post-war commemoration and place/space, ecology and the environment
– Post-war memory and/or trauma
– Commemoration in relation to post-war displacement, migration, settlement and belonging
– Diasporic / exilic post-war commemoration
– Post-war commemoration and the body
– Comparative post-war commemoration

‘Post-war’ can relate to any armed conflict and we welcome submissions addressing commemoration across cultures and time periods. AV equipment will be available and you are welcome to use PowerPoint or other presentation software.

The conference is free to attend and will include lunch and refreshments.

How to apply
Please send an abstract of 250 words for a 20-minute paper and a short biography (max. 150 words) in a single Word document to postwarconference2018@gmail.com by Friday 23 March 2018. Applicants will be notified of the outcome in early April.

Travel bursaries
A number of travel bursaries of up to £300 will be available on a competitive basis. If you wish to apply for a travel bursary, please include a short paragraph (max. 300 words) in your application, detailing how your work fits with the themes of the Series and how your research will benefit from attending the Conference. Please itemise your estimated expenditure.

CfP: Identity and Memory in War and Peacebuilding

Date of the Conference: July 2,2018
Place: Liverpool Hope University, Hope Park Campus, Liverpool L16 9JD
Deadline for abstract submissions: April 1, 2018

Identity and memory play key overlapping roles in both war and peacebuilding. Indeed, the construction of collective identities can make a difference between choosing war or choosing more peaceful paths to dispute resolution. Identity is also deeply entwined in the ways we choose to remember past wars, through commemorations and memorials.

In this conference, we are seeking contributions from scholars who are interested in questions related to identity, broadly conceived, (including nationality, ethnicity, gender, profession, etc.) and memory inwar and peacebuilding, such as:

What are the narratives that shape identity in war?
How do we commemorate those who have lost their lives in war (civilians, militia or soldiers)?
How do we recast stories of ourselves, of groupness, and of inter-group relations in post-conflict contexts?
What is the role of identity and/or memory in peacebuilding contexts?
What is the role of identity and/or memory in the aftermath of a conflict?
How does identity and/or memory relate to historical, current or future conflict scenarios?
What is the role of war commemoration practices in overcoming conflict?
What would rather be forgotten than remembered?

Please send abstracts of maximum 300 words (word format) for presentations lasting no more than 20 minutes, together with a maximum of 5 keywords and a biography of 150 words including name, title, institutional affiliation, contact information and technical requirements where applicable to tutu@hope.ac.uk by April 1, 2018.

Information about registration to the conference will be posted soon in our webpage. For any enquiries please email us at tutu@hope.ac.uk

Postgraduate Forum: Commemoration and Creativity, 10 March 2018

Saturday 10 March 2018, 9am-5pm
Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Headington Road, OX3 0BP

This exciting Postgraduate Creative Forum is part of the Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, Reconciliation, which explores and compares the ways in which commemorative practices across cultures both contribute to and challenge post-war reconstruction and reconciliation. The one-day event is aimed at postgraduate students across the Humanities and Social Sciences. You are invited to showcase your work in short presentations (max. 5 minutes) and there will also be discussion and activities exploring how creative and sensorial thinking might illuminate and enrich your research.

This is an opportunity for you to experiment with innovative ways of presenting your research in a short format. You might, for example, focus on a question such as: What is the keystone of my argument? Can I summarise my thesis in a sentence? What is my most important finding so far? The rationale is that distilling and presenting the essence of your research will help you to think about it in a new way and thereby produce fresh insights.

We invite submissions on any aspect of post-war commemoration. Please send an abstract of 250 words and a short biography (max. 150 words) in a single Word document to catherine.gilbert@ell.ox.ac.uk by Monday 29 January 2018. Applicants will be notified of the outcome in early February.

Possible topics for presentations include, but are not limited to:
– The modes and genres of post-war commemoration
– The beneficiaries of post-war commemoration
– The ways in which post-war commemoration contributes to reconstruction and reconciliation
– The future of post-war commemoration, including digital commemoration
– The politics of post-war commemoration
– Post-war commemorative monuments and/or museums
– Post-war commemoration and place/space, ecology and the environment
– Post-war memory
– Post-war commemoration and trauma
– Commemoration in relation to post-war displacement, migration, settlement and belonging
– Diasporic / exilic post-war commemoration
– Post-war commemoration and the body
– Comparative post-war commemoration

‘Post-war’ can relate to any conflict and we welcome submissions addressing commemoration across cultures and time periods. AV equipment will be available and you are welcome to use PowerPoint.

In addition to the presentations, the day will offer two sessions designed to explore how creative and practical activities can extend and transform academic thinking:

Three of our Series poets-in-residence, Susie Campbell, Mariah Whelan and Sue Zatland, will lead a Poetry Workshop, in which they will read their own poems and invite you to think about how the cognitive processes involved in creating poetry might be applied to academic research and writing.

Dr Justine Shaw (University of Oxford) will lead a Candle-Pouring, in which you will create your own memory candle scented with ‘rosemary for remembrance’ (Hamlet). As you do so, you will be invited to explore ways in which an understanding of the senses and the body might contribute to your own academic practice.

The day is FREE to attend and will include lunch and refreshments.

A number of small travel bursaries (up to £50) will be available. If you wish to apply for a travel bursary, please include a short paragraph (max. 300 words) in your application, detailing how your work fits with the themes of the Series and how your research will benefit from attending the Postgraduate Forum.

Cultures and Commemorations of War. Workshop 2: Lest We Forget? Reconsidering FWW Memory. 11 Dec. IWM

Cultures and Commemorations of War: An Interdisciplinary Seminar Series
Workshop Two: Lest We Forget? Reconsidering First World War Memory

Monday 11 December, Orpen Room, Imperial War Museum
Funded by a British Academy Rising Stars Engagement Award

This interdisciplinary seminar series ‘Cultures and Commemorations of War’ brings together early career researchers and advanced scholars working on the memory of war in a range of disciplines with practitioners, policy makers, charities, and representatives from the media and culture and heritage industries. Through a series of three one-day workshops held in Oxford and London in 2017-18, this series aims to foster an interdisciplinary dialogue about the history and nature of war commemoration across time and its cultural, social, psychological and political iterations.

This second workshop will consider the ways that we remember the First World War, focusing on recent commemorative projects as case studies of war commemoration and memory making. The keynotes in the afternoon are Paul Cummins, the artist behind the poppies at the Tower of London, and Jeremy Deller, who devised We’re Here Because We’re Here (https://becausewearehere.co.uk/). Here’s a 2014 video about making the poppies and a 2017 video about the poppies at Plymouth Hoe on the Poppies Tour (#poppiestour).

The schedule and poster are below. Registration is £15 (standard) and £10 (concession) and includes lunch, coffee and a reception.
Please register here: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/conferences-events/english-faculty/english-faculty-events/cultures-and-commemorations-of-war-workshop-two-lest-we-forget

For more information, contact Alice Kelly (alice.kelly@rai.ox.ac.uk)

9.00-9.30: Registration

9.30-9.45: Opening Remarks – Alice Kelly

9.45-11: Roundtable: What have we learnt from the FWW Centenary?
Emma Hanna, Pierre Purseigle, Anna Maguire, Jane Potter

11-11.30: Coffee

11.30-12.45: Panel: Case Studies in Public Memory and Education
Glyn Prysor, Catriona Pennell, Paul Cornish

12.45-13.45: Lunch

13.45-14.45: Keynote 1 – Jeremy Deller, in conversation with John Horne

14.45-15.15: Coffee

15.15-16.15: Keynote 2 – Paul Cummins, in conversation with Alice Kelly

16.15-17.15: Panel: Conclusions – The Next 100 Years
Lucy Noakes, Ross Wilson, John Horne

5.15-6pm: Wine Reception

CfP: Aftermath: German and Austrian cultural responses to the end of the First World War (1918-1933)

The international workshop ‘Aftermath: German and Austrian cultural responses to the end of the First World War’ will be held at King’s College London on 13-15 September 2018.

The end of World War I marked the beginning of a period of political turbulence and social upheaval in both Germany and Austria. Contrary to popular belief, the conflict did not end overnight with the signing of the Armistice on 11th November 1918; instead, a lengthy series of peace negotiations took place, concluding with the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923. These negotiations and treaties resulted in considerable losses for both Germany and Austria: national boundaries were redrawn and colonial territories removed, reparations were imposed, and Germany and her allies were compelled to accept full blame for the conflict. In their early years, the Weimar Republic and the First Austrian Republic were buffeted by revolts and uprisings from both right and left, as different political groups sought to assert their competing visions of post-war society.

In spite of these turbulent events, the years after World War I saw the development of a flourishing cultural scene. As major centres of European modernism, Germany and Austria became associated with writers, musicians, artists and filmmakers who engaged in radical formal experimentation and rejected conventional values and aesthetic norms. Yet the post-war period also saw the resurgence and reinvention of more traditional modes of representation through movements such as Neue Sachlichkeit [new objectivity] and the ‘return to order’. Recent scholarship has highlighted the falsity of the traditional dichotomy of the ‘progressive’ and the ‘anti-modern’, showing how the co-existence of plural and seemingly contradictory cultural practices reflected specifically modern anxieties about language, culture and politics. However, questions still remain about the impact of war and defeat on post-war cultural production: in what ways did ‘the double wound of war and defeat fester beneath the […] surface’ [Anton Kaes] of interwar culture? And to what extent did the need to come to terms with experiences of loss and defeat result in what Jay Winter terms the ‘recasting of traditional language’ in an ‘attempt to find collective solace’ after 1918?

The approaching centenary of 1918 offers a timely opportunity to assess the impact of the end of World War I on German and Austrian cultural production in the interwar period. This interdisciplinary workshop aims to shed light on ways in which German and Austrian literature, art, music and film were shaped – both directly and indirectly – by experiences of wartime defeat and political unrest in the period up to 1933. How did cultural practitioners respond to the various peace settlements of 1918-1923, and how did they engage with the associated political turmoil and social upheaval? What role did culture play in envisioning and shaping a new, post-war society? And in what ways did the legacy of the war continue to influence the cultural production of the interwar years?

Scholarship on this area has often tended to concentrate on certain left-wing intellectuals and pacifists, regarding the experience of military defeat and the consequences of the peace treaties of 1918-23 as a taboo subject for all but a few individuals. The workshop seeks to broaden this focus by exposing the rich variety of cultural responses to the end of the war and considering their significance for our understanding of the cultural climate in which the Weimar Republic and the First Austrian Republic came into existence. Its comparative, interdisciplinary scope will enable similarities and differences to be traced across various forms of cultural practice, allowing light to be shed on the shifting relationships between politics and aesthetics in this period.

We invite proposals for papers of 20 minutes in length. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, cultural engagement with the following:

– Peace and (ongoing) conflict
– Experiences of defeat, questions of war guilt and individual/collective responsibility;
– Revolutionary politics and revolution(s);
– Territorial losses and the reshaping of national identity;
– Internationalism and the foundation of a new global order;
– The return of war veterans and their adaptation to civilian life;
– Women’s responses to the end of the war and their emergence as political subjects;
– Commemoration, memory and memorialisation;
– Modern vs. ‘anti-modern’ aesthetic practices;
– Visions of a post-war society.

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biographical note to Catherine Smale (catherine.smale@kcl.ac.uk) by 31 January 2018.

The workshop will include a guided tour of the exhibition ‘Aftermath: Art in the wake of WW1’ at Tate Britain, as well as a screening of G. W. Pabst’s film Westfront 1918 – Vier von der Infanterie (1930) held in collaboration with the German Screen Studies Network. Keynote talks will be given by Ingrid Sharp (Leeds) and James Van Dyke (Missouri). Conversations are underway for the publication of selected papers in a journal special issue in 2019.