CfP: “Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (Russia’s Great War & Revolution, 1914-1922)

Russia’s Great War and Revolution, 1914-1922 (RGWR) is a decade-long, international, multidisciplinary effort generating new scholarly research focusing on Eurasia’s “continuum of crisis” at the dawn of the twentieth century. The project’s core participants comprise an international group of more than forty distinguished scholars. Since 2008 RGWR editors have been recruiting and selecting essays from scholars, academics, and exceptional graduate students from around the globe for publication and dissemination in a series of edited volumes being produced by Slavica Publishers.

To date, the two volumes addressing “Culture” and “The Empire and Nationalism at War” and the first book of the third volume “Home Front” have been published. Three additional “Home Front” books will appear by mid-2106.

RGWR Project Team members are interested in producing a stand-alone volume on “Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (STEEM) and seek to identify individuals willing to contribute an original essay to the collection. Essays may involve any aspect of the history/culture of STEEM (broadly construed) across Russia and Eurasia between c. 1914-1922.

Younger scholars, including recent ABDs, are particularly encouraged to participate. Non-native English-speaking colleagues are welcome to submit their essays in their native language.

Deadline for the delivery of initial essay drafts is: 1 February 2017. Following the process of peer-review, revision, and editing the final volume is expected to appear by November 2018.

For more information about the project, please visit the RGWR website.

Further information and contact details here.

CfS: Painting, Memory and the Great War

Call for Submissions for a volume on ‘Painting, Memory and the Great War’, edited by Margaret Hutchinson and Steven Trout.

Over the past century, paintings of the Great War have played an important role in shaping and expressing public memory of the conflict. Indeed, many canvases—think, for example, of the Panthéon de la Guerre or John Singer Sargent’s iconic Gassed—have enjoyed just as much cultural prominence as photographs or works of cinema. The Great War represents a “last hurrah” for painting as a significant form of cultural war remembrance. This volume will examine paintings as sites of memory, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artists and their patrons, both of whom were responsible for determining what was remembered in, and what was absent from, the

This volume seeks to draw together essays addressing individual paintings from a range of belligerent nations, including (but not limited to) Austria-Hungary, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Russia, and the United States. Each chapter will focus on the history of a single work and its role in the construction, consolidation, or perpetuation of memory. The paintings themselves may come from a wide variety of genres and styles. We are open to essays that explore the complexity of works produced during the conflict or afterwards, whether by independent painters or by members of official wartime art programs or post-war commemoration projects.

The University of Alabama Press has agreed to consider this collection as part of its new book series War, Memory and Culture. Publication is contingent upon successful external review. Please submit an abstract of 300 words outlining your proposed chapter to Margaret Hutchison and Steven Trout by 1 March 2016. Essays of 7, 000 words inclusive of footnotes in current Chicago Style format are to be submitted no later than 30 November 2016. Inquiries are welcome.