CfP: The Multiplicity of Exits from the War: the Experience of the Eastern Front Cities

National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” (Kyiv, Ukraine); Center for Urban History (Lviv, Ukraine)
August 28-30, 2018: 3 days (2 conference days and 1 study tour day)

Organizers:
Center for Urban History (Lviv, Ukraine);
History department, National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” (Kyiv, Ukraine);
University of Victoria (Victoria, Canada)

Deadlines:
*Extended deadline: April 1, 2018 for proposals*
July 16, 2018 for pre-circulated papers

Contact:
conferences@lvivcenter.org

The International Conference entitled “The Multiplicity of Exits from the War: the Experience of the Eastern Front Cities” is the second of the events dedicated to studying the urban experience of the Great War in the areas where the Eastern Front ran from the Baltic to the Caucasus. The first event, an international seminar “The City Experience of the Great War in Eastern Europe”, took place on June 23-25, 2016 at the Center for Urban History of the Central Eastern Europe in Lviv.

The purpose of our conference is to focus on the period of the end of the Great War, which on the Eastern Front was accompanied by revolutions, formation of national states, civilian wars, and armed conflicts for disputed territories. Chronologically, it covers the years 1917-1923: from the February Revolution in the Russian Empire to the final determination of borders in post-war Eastern Europe. Consequently, this era was a period of transformation when new political practices were introduced in conditions of general social and economic instability, violence and impunity, demobilization and new mobilization. At the same time, these years can be considered as an approbation period of practices which will eventually become dominant in the totalitarian states of the USSR and the Third Reich: controlling people through the introduction of cards and the differentiation of society by ethnic/class/political criteria.

Participants:
This will be an international and pre-circulated papers conference with open call and invited keynote speakers. We expect to host 20-25 participants from Ukraine and abroad. We also invite keynote speakers, who will deliver lectures and address the most acute aspects of subjects discussed during the conference. Our aim is to bring together distinguished scholars and researchers from a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to history, anthropology, geography, peace and conflict studies, literature, performing arts, media studies and related disciplines. Advanced PhD students and young researchers from Eastern Europe are especially encouraged to apply and contribute. The working language of the workshop is English.

How to apply:
In order to take part in the conference one has to submit her/his abstract (up to 500 words); short bio (up to 150 words); contact information by April 1, 2018. Successful applicants will be notified by April 15, 2018. They will have to send a short version of presentation (up to 5,000 words) by July 16, 2018. All the papers will be sent to discussants for reviews in advance. Each panel will consist of no more than 4 presenters, moderator and a discussant. Time-limit for a presentation is no longer than 20 minutes.

Program Costs
The organizers will cover accommodation, meals, and excursions within the program. There is limited funding for travel. Therefore we ask you to indicate if you need financial support, and when possible, to inquire about additional conference funding from your home institutions.

Full details of the CfP here.

CfP: Violence and Conflict Workshop, University of Cambridge

The Violence and Conflict Workshop invites graduate students to submit papers to be presented in Lent Term 2016. The workshop is interested in submissions which explore the themes of violence and conflict, understood both in physical manifestations such as war, crime, rebellion, etc., as well as psychological/systemic forms including colonialism, slavery, and discrimination. We encourage submissions from any regional or geographical focus, and from Late Antiquity to the present day.

We welcome both works in progress and completed projects, as well as graduate research in its early stages of development. Papers should be approximately 30 minutes and will be followed by discussion and light refreshments. The workshop will meet every Friday at 4pm in Room S3 of the Alison Richard Building, University of Cambridge.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to violence.conflict@gmail.com no later than 3 January 2016.

Book Launch: Violence: A Modern Obsession

Violence, it seems, is on everyone’s mind. It constantly is in the news; it has given rise to an enormous historical, sociological, and philosophical literature; it occupies a prominent place in popular entertainment; and it is regarded as one of the fundamental problems affecting social, political and interpersonal relations. After a century that has been described as the most violent in the history of humanity, Professor Richard Bessel has written a new history of our violent world and how we have become obsessed about violence. He critiques the great themes of modern history from revolutionary upheavals around the globe, to the two world wars and the murder of the European Jews, to the great purges and, more recently, terrorism. Bessel sheds light on this phenomenon and how our sensitivity towards violence has grown and has affected the ways in which we understand the world around us – in terms of religious faith, politics, military confrontation, the role of the state, as well as of interpersonal and intimate relations. He critiques our modern day relationship with violence and how despite its continuing and inevitable nature, we have become more committed to limiting and suppressing it. Both historically questioning and intensely evocative of the most vicious and brutal violence enacted by mankind, this book shows how the place of violence in the modern world presents a number of paradoxes and how it is an inescapable theme in human history.

Richard Bessel is Professor of Twentieth Century History at the University of York. He works on the social and political history of modern Germany, the aftermath of the two world wars and the history of policing. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of German History and History Today. His books include Political Violence and the Rise of Nazism, Germany after the First World War and Nazism and War.

Chair: Patricia Clavin (Jesus College)
Panelists: Jane Caplan (St Antony’s), Paul Betts (St Antony’s), Nick Stargardt (Magdalen)

Venue: European Studies Centre, St Antony’s College, 70 Woodstock Road

Discounted copies from Simon & Schuster will be available

* Please let Paul Betts (paul.betts@sant.ox.ac.uk) know if you plan to attend, so that they can arrange refreshments.