CfP: 1918 – 2018: The End of the War & The Reshaping of a Century

This conference, hosted by the Centre for Historical Research at the University of Wolverhampton in association with the WFA and the FWW Network for Early Career & Postgraduate Researchers, seeks to spotlight the latest research on the events of 1918 as well as the global significances, consequences, and legacy of this watershed year.

It will be held at the University of Wolverhampton on 6-8 September 2018

Keynotes to include: Professor Alison Fell (Leeds), Professor Peter Frankopan (Oxford), Professor John Horne (TCD), Professor Gary Sheffield (Wolverhampton), Professor Sir Hew Strachan (St Andrews), Professor Laura Ugolini (Wolverhampton) & Professor Jay Winter (Yale).

We invite abstracts for 20-minute presentations fitting within the conference topic. Therein we encourage international perspectives and seek a range of historical approaches together with cross-disciplinary insights. Suggested themes may include but are not limited to:

Warfare in 1918
The War in 1918
Women in 1918
Strategy, Tactics & Technology
Victory & Defeat
Winners & Losers
Peace & (Ongoing) Conflict
Aftermaths, Legacies & Impacts
Veterans (Male & Female)
Civilians & Consequences
Gender, Class, Race & Ethnicity
Ends & Beginnings
Learning/Understanding the War
Commemoration & Memory
The Centenary

Abstracts of 250 words should be accompanied by your name, affiliation (if applicable) and a brief biographical statement (c. 100 words). Panel submissions will also be considered.

We welcome submissions from scholars, including ECRs & PGRs, as well as independent researchers, organisations, and community projects. We hope (subject to funding) to offer a limited number of bursaries to assist ECRs/PGRs & community groups to participate.

Submissions should be sent to Dr Oliver Wilkinson ( by 3rd January 2018

Conference registration is expected to open in spring 2018

Keep up to date at our website ( and follow us on Twitter (@1918to2018)

CfP: Seeking third paper for panel on internationalism, warfare, & popular politics in interwar Britain (NACBS 2016)

We are two doctoral candidates seeking a third participant for a proposed panel on internationalism, warfare, popular politics, and humanitarianism in Britain between the world wars, for the 2016 NACBS session in Washington, D.C.

One paper will focus on popular internationalism and the transnational circulation of commercial narratives of the Great War in the theatre and film industries during the 1920s and 1930s. The other paper will examine the transnational circulation of British and French press among British relief workers and its use in humanitarian campaigns during the Spanish Civil War.

Submissions for the NACBS close on 2 March 2016. We are asking interested participants to submit a CV and abstract to both Emily Curtis Walters ( & Kerrie Holloway ( by Sunday, 31 January 2016.

Further information here.

Trinity Term 2015 – Research Seminars in the History of Medicine, Oxford

Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series: Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine
Seminar Room, 47 Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 6PE

The following seminars will be held at on Mondays at 2.15pm
Coffee will be available from 2.00pm

‘Medicine and Modern Warfare’, Convener: Dr Roderick Bailey

Week 1 – 27 April
Ben Shephard, Bristol
‘Culture, politics or biology? How does American PTSD relate to European war trauma?’

Week 2 – 4 May
Bank Holiday – No Seminar

Week 3 – 11 May
Emily Mayhew, Imperial College London and Daffyd Edwards, Centre for Blast Injury Studies, Imperial College London
‘From the Western Front to Field Hospital Camp Bastion: How the foundations of military medicine in the 21st Century were laid in the Great War’

Week 4 – 18 May
Roderick Bailey, University of Oxford
‘Permanent make-up: Body modification and wartime disguise, 1939-45’

Week 5 – 25 May
Bank Holiday – No Seminar

Week 6 – 1 June
Ulf Schmidt, University of Kent
‘Secret science: A century of poison warfare and human experiments’

Week 7 – 8 June
Hazel Croft, Birkbeck, University of London
‘“It would frighten you to see the people sent to this place”: Why did the emotional and nervous states of women factory workers provoke such concern in Britain in the Second World War?’

Week 8 – 15 June
Sam Alberti, Royal College of Surgeons, London
‘Drawing bodies: British medical art in the early-twentieth century’

Physics and the Great War

Centre for the History and Philosophy of Physics, St Cross College, Oxford
Saturday, June 13 2015, 10.30 am – 5.30 pm

wirelessArguably the First World War saw the greatest advent of new science and technology and the role of science in warfare than any conflict hitherto. On land the innovations of barbed wire, machine guns and eventually, tanks changed the nature of land battles. At sea, radio communications changed operation of surface fleets and the introduction of submarine warfare changed the nature of war at sea. This war saw also the advent of aerial warfare which was to change the nature of all future wars. This conference seeks to review the key ways in which physics and its mathematics changed the nature of conflict from various points of views: technical, historical and sociological.

Further information here. Download the poster: Physics and the Great War Poster

Registration to attend this conference is free, but must be confirmed using the Conference booking form by Monday 8th June.