CfP: 85th Annual Meeting of the Society for Military History

The Society for Military History is pleased to call for papers for its 85th Annual Meeting, hosted by the University of Louisville’s College of Arts & Sciences and the Department of History in Louisville, Kentucky.

For the 2018 meeting, the program committee will consider paper and panel proposals on all aspects of military history, especially encouraging submissions that reflect on this year’s theme, Landscapes of War and Peace.

We will mark two particularly important anniversaries in 2018, the centennial of the end of the First World War and four hundred years since the beginning of the Thirty Years’ War, one of the most destructive conflicts in history. The program committee invites submissions that explore the outbreak of warfare and the difficult ways out of fighting and towards peace. Because the conference will be hosted in the heart of the Ohio country, locale of many early American conflicts, the program committee is also interested in submissions that focus on the geography, environment, and spaces of warfare.

Submissions of pre-organized panels and roundtables are strongly encouraged and will be given preference in the selection process. Excellent panel, paper, and poster proposals will clearly explain their topics and questions in ways that will be understandable to the broad membership of the SMH, not only to those interested in the specific topics in question. Additionally, the SMH encourages the representation of the full diversity of its membership and especially values panel and roundtable proposals that reflect the organization’s diversity of institutional affiliations, various career paths and ranks, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Panel proposals must include a panel title and 300-word abstract summarizing the theme of the panel; paper title and a 300-word abstract for each paper proposed; and a one-page curriculum vitae for each panelist (including the chair and commentator) that includes institutional affiliation, email address, and other contact information.

Roundtable proposals must include a roundtable title, the full names and institutional affiliations of each participant, a 300-word abstract summarizing the roundtable’s themes and points of discussion, and a one-page curriculum vitae for each participant (including the moderator, if any).

Poster proposals allow military historians (especially, but not limited to, graduate students) to share their research through visual materials. Proposals should clearly explain (in no more than 300 words) the poster’s topics and arguments, as well as how the information will be presented visually.

Individual paper proposals are also welcome and must include a 300-word abstract of the paper, and one-page vita with contact information and email address. If accepted, individual papers will be assigned by the program committee to an appropriate panel with a chair and commentator. Those who wish to volunteer to serve as chairs and commenters should send a one-page curriculum vitae to the program committee chair.

Participants may present one paper, serve on a roundtable, or provide panel comments. They may not fill more than one of these roles during the conference, nor should they propose to do so to the Program Committee. Members who act as panel chairs for only one session may deliver a paper, serve on a roundtable, or offer comments in a different session. Members who serve as both the chair and commentator of a single session may not present in another session.

All submissions must be made through the 2018 SMH Submission Portal. One person will need to gather all required information for panel and roundtable submissions and enter the information in the portal. Individual paper and poster submissions can be made by the individual. For questions about the submission process, please contact smh2018@louisville.edu.

All proposals must be submitted by October 1, 2017. All accepted presenters, chairs, and commentators must be members of the Society for Military History by December 31, 2017 to be placed on the conference program.

2018 SMH Submission Portal: www.smh-hq.org/2018submissions.html.
Further information here.

Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships

The GHI (German Historical Institute, Washington DC) awards short-term fellowships to European and North American doctoral students as well as postdoctoral scholars to pursue research projects that draw upon primary sources located in the United States.

We are particularly interested in research projects that fit into the following fields:

German and European history
The history of German-American relations
The role of Germany and the USA in international relations
American history (European doctoral and postdoctoral scholars only)

The proposed research projects should make use of historical methods and engage with the relevant historiography. We especially invite applications from doctoral students and postdoctoral scholars who currently have no funding from their home institutions. The fellowships are usually granted for periods of one to five months but, in exceptional cases and depending on the availability of funds, they can be extended by one month.

The GHI will not provide funding for preliminary research, manuscript composition, or the revision of manuscripts. It will give clear priority to those postdoc projects that are designed for the “second book.” The fellowship is open to both doctoral and postdoctoral scholars based in North America and Europe. The monthly stipend is € 2,000 for doctoral students and € 3,400 for postdoctoral scholars. In addition, fellowship recipients based in Europe will receive reimbursement for their round-trip airfare to the U.S.

The GHI has two deadlines each year for the fellowships: April 1 and October 1. The next deadline for applications is October 1, 2017.

Eligibility Requirements
Applicants should be based at (or recent graduates of) a North American or European university or research institute.
For doctoral students applying, ABD status is required before starting the fellowship.
For postdoctoral scholars applying, the preference is for projects that are designed for the “second book” (Habilitation or equivalent).
The proposed project should require primary research in the United States.

Application Procedure
To apply please send the following materials (as a pdf) to fellowships@ghi-dc.org:

Application form
Brief cover letter
Curriculum vitae
A copy of your most recent diploma or transcripts
Project description (no more than 2,000 words)
At least one letter of reference (sent separately)

Please combine all of your application materials except for the application form into a single PDF and include a word count at the end of your project description. Applicants may write in either English or German; we recommend that they use the language in which they are most proficient. Applicants will be notified about the outcome approximately two months after the deadline.

Further information here.
Questions about applying or for the fellowship program in general should be directed to Bryan Hart (hart@ghi-dc.org).

Conference: Nerves and War. Psychological Experiences of Mobilization and Suffering in Germany, 1900-1933

12-13 October 2017, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Organized by Gundula Gahlen, Björn Hofmeister, Christoph Nübel and Deniza Petrova

´Nerves´ enjoyed a central place in German debates about war at the beginning of the 20th Century. Politicians, scientists, the public, and the military discussed the extent to which a future war would strain the nerves of German society. Concepts of ´strength of nerves´ as well as of ´weakness of nerves´ were increasingly used as combat terms during the First World War. The massive scale of experiences of psychological injuries and suffering only added to this phenomenon. The social and political administration of the medical treatment of psychological war disabilities presided over post-war discourses of managing the consequences of war. Simultaneously, a new spiritual mobilization for war followed in the Weimar Republic, which, after 1933, ´synchronized´ almost all aspects of social life in the Third Reich.

Current scholarship has devoted substantial historical research to the treatment and accommodation of psychological war-disabled veterans. This conference focuses on contemporary discourses on nerves in politics, society, science, and the military and aspires to elaborate the interaction as well as their practical consequences of these discourses for the period of 1900 and 1933. At this conference nerves are understood as a code and a construct that are central in negotiating identity. Both, contemporary discourses on nerves as well as individual and collective experiences of psychological mobilization and suffering will be presented and analyzed. The focus of the conference papers is on Germany, but in a wider European context.

Venue: Freie Universität Berlin, Fabeckstraße 23-25, 14195 Berlin, Room: 2.2059

Please register/contact us by October 5, 2017 at: dpetrova@zedat.fu-berlin.de

For further information please visit the conference website: www.nervenundkrieg.de

Call for Applications – Carnegie Council’s “The Living Legacy of the First World War”

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is now accepting applications for the World War I fellowship project, “The Living Legacy of the First World War.” Carnegie Council is creating up to ten fellowships to conduct projects involving original research, approaches, or methods on the American experience in the First World War and its impact and relevance in the modern world.

With this project, Carnegie Council aims to advance a vision of history that is diverse, dynamic, and inclusive. This approach begins with the selection of fellows of varying ages, backgrounds, and interests. In designing a research proposal, applicants are encouraged to draw on personal passions, integrating unique perspectives and insights into historical debates.

Selected fellows will research independently over the next year. Fellows will then share their findings and analysis in an article written for publication on CarnegieCouncil.org, in Ethics & International Affairs, or through another academic or popular publisher. In the case of graphic or other non-traditional projects, a written report may be substituted for an article. To reach a broader audience, the fellows will participate in a podcast interview series on CarnegieCouncil.org, where they will discuss their work. Fellows may also be invited to speak at other events associated with the centenary of World War I.

To apply, please submit a research proposal (1,000 words or fewer), curriculum vitae, and two references to program assistant Billy Pickett at bpickett@cceia.org by Friday, September 15, 2017. Proposals should include the following: the proposed research topic with background; the feasibility of the research; and the topic’s bearing on the present, whether in ethical debates, political discourse, governing institutions, demography, law, international relations, or other areas. Individuals of all nationalities are encouraged to apply, though articles and interviews will be published primarily in English.

Thanks to the generous support of the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, fellows will receive a stipend to support their research.

For questions, please contact the lead administrator for the World War I fellowship project and Carnegie Council senior fellow, Reed Bonadonna at rbonadonna@cceia.org.

CFP: Vulcan Early-Career Prize: social history of military technology

The Vulcan Early-Career Prize for the best article in the field of social history of military technology

Vulcan: The International Journal of the Social History of Military Technology invites submissions for its inaugural Early-Career Prize. The winning article as judged by the editorial board will be published in the 2018 volume (6) of Vulcan, and will officially be announced as the prize winner in the journal volume as well as on the journal webpage. The winner will receive a cash prize of €500. The prize is open to graduate students who are currently registered at a higher education institute, or to those who have obtained their doctoral degree after January 1, 2012.

Vulcan is a peer-reviewed journal, appearing in one issue per year, that addresses military technology as both agent and object of social change. Vulcan publishes original research articles, book reviews, and short notes and communications that go beyond traditional hardware stories of military technology. Academic and popular histories of weapons, warships and other physical manifestations of warfare have tended to assume a strictly utilitarian or rational basis for invention, innovation and use. Such approaches may ignore some very important questions: What are the social values, attitudes, and military (and non-military) interests that shape and support or oppose these technologies? What are the consequences of gender, race, class, and other aspects of the social order for the nature and use of military technology? Or, more generally, how do social and cultural environments within the military itself or in the larger society affect military technological change? And the indispensable corollary: how does changing military technology affect other aspects of society and culture?

Vulcan casts a wide net, taking a very broad view of technology and its wider ramifications that encompasses not only the production, distribution, use, and replacement of weapons and weapon systems, but also communications, logistic, scientific, medical, and other technologies of military relevance. Papers may range widely in space and time, and we welcome especially submissions on non-Western and premodern topics. Themes might include the ways in which social factors (including politics and economics), and other extra-military factors have influenced and been influenced by the invention, R&D, diffusion, or use of military technologies; the roles that military technologies play in shaping and reshaping the relationships between institutions; historiographical or museological topics that discuss how military technology has been analyzed, interpreted, and understood in other fields, other cultures, and other times.
Submission Requirements

Articles should be based extensively on primary research, must not have been previously published in another form or outlet, and should not be currently under consideration by another journal or book series. Essays (between 8,000 and 12,000 words) should be written in American English, and conform to The Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition). Papers should include an abstract of approximately 150 words and 5–8 keywords. Detailed submission instructions can be found at brill.com/vulc. Submissions for the prize should be submitted online through the Vulcan Editorial Manager by 31 December 2017. In order to allow for sufficient time for the peer review process, early submissions are welcomed.

For further information, please contact the Editor-in-Chief, Steven A. Walton at sawalton@mtu.edu.

CfP: ISFWWS: Recording, Narrating and Archiving the First World War, Melbourne July 2018

Monday, 9 July 2018 to Wednesday, 11 July 2018
Deakin Downtown, 2 Collins Square, 727 Collins Street, Melbourne

Following the success of the Oxford conference in November 2016, we are delighted to announce that the 10th conference of the International Society for First World War Studies will be held in Melbourne, Australia – our first to be held in the southern hemisphere!

We are thrilled that Professor Joan Beaumont of the Australian National University, and Professor Michael Roper of the University of Essex will be keynote speakers.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The ways in which contemporaries recorded the First World War have inevitably shaped the kinds of histories we have produced over the last century. The war was being recorded and archived as it happened – and for decades after – for particular reasons and particular purposes. The processes of recording and archiving have bequeathed in different times and places alternately a very rich, very partial, and very prejudiced record of conflict and its legacies.

This conference revisits the creation, recreation and transmission of knowledge about the war, especially in comparative and transnational frames. It encourages analysis of media presentations of the war during and after the fighting, the place of official and unofficial historians, networks of private knowledge, the development of oral histories, the work of family historians, collectors, archivists, curators and librarians, in order to understand how the war has been reconceptualised over time, and how the records of war facilitate or inhibit new perspectives.

Potential themes for conference panels and presentations are:

o Production, preservation and transmission of the records of war over time
o Archives, museums and the shaping of a record of war
o Military analyses and uses of the First World War
o Press, propaganda and the record of war
o Official and unofficial representations of war
o Family history and intergenerational transmission of the war
o Creating and accessing knowledge of war in a digital era
o Recording and archiving the centenary
o Fiction, film and popular consumption of the war

Submission Guidelines

Presenters will deliver twenty-minute papers followed by discussion. Proposals should be approximately 300 words in length. Applications should also be accompanied by a short biography. Panel proposals are welcome.

The working language of the conference and all submissions is English. The organisers intend to publish an edited collection from selected presentations.

Submission Email Address: fwws2018@deakin.edu.au
Closing Date for Submissions: 30 September 2017
Further information here.
Download call for papers: CFP Final

RAF Museum Academic Prizes

For the second year running the RAF Museum is sponsoring a series of academic prizes to reward high-quality research in the field of air power studies broadly defined. The prizes consist of an award for the best undergraduate and Masters prize respectively and a bursary to support a PhD candidate in the final year of their studies. For the purpose of each prize, ‘air power studies’ is to be understood in its broadest sense, encompassing not only the history of air warfare broadly defined, but also related fields such as archaeology, international relations, strategic studies, law and ethics, and museology. The prizes are not confined to works focused on the RAF but includes those which help tell the Service’s story. Details for each prize can be found in the descriptors below.

Applications are open from 1 July 2017 to 1 October 2017, and the museum will make a decision towards the end of the year. If you are interested in entering or know anyone who is eligible to enter, then please consider applying for the prize.

Descriptors:
The Royal Air Force Museum Undergraduate Prize in Air Power Studies
The Royal Air Force Museum Masters Prize in Air Power Studies
The Royal Air Force Museum PhD Bursary in Air Power Studies