CFP: Medical History of WWI

Proposals Deadline: 10 November 2017

Over 22-25 March 2018, the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences will be co-sponsoring a conference on the medical history of WWI.

It will be hosted at the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School in San Antonio, Texas.

Presentations on all facets of medicine and healthcare related to the war are welcome, to include: historical understandings of military medicine as practiced by all participants and in all geographic regions; consideration of the repercussions of the war on the practice of medicine; medicine in various campaigns; effects on the home fronts; postwar medical issues; mental health issues; the pandemic influenza; and related topics.

Presentations should be 30 minutes long, and two-paper panels are welcome.

As with the 2012 conference, we anticipate publication of selected papers.

Contact: Dr Sanders Marble, Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage, william.s.marble.civ@mail.mil

CfP: The Brest Peace Conference and the international relations in Central Europe (1917–1918)

We are inviting proposals for the panel ‘The Brest Peace Conference and the international relations in Central Europe (1917–1918)’, which will take place at the 7th International Congress of Belarusian Studies on 15–17 September 2017 in Warsaw, Poland.

This panel aims to demonstrate the research potential of the topic of international relations in Central Europe at the final stage of the Great War.

If you wish to take part in the panel, please submit an application form by 10 May 2017, including your paper proposal from 2000 to 4000 characters, following the link: https://palityka.wufoo.eu/forms/application-form-for-speakers-2017/

It is well known that the signature of separate peace treaties between the Central Powers and Ukraine and Russia at the Brest Peace Conference in February-March 1918 (and with Romania in May) helped the regional powers to build a new international architecture for Central Europe. However, this process substantially changed after the defeat of the Central Powers in autumn 1918. As a consequence, the traditional historiography pays most of its attention to the Entente policy (and the Paris Peace Conference of 1919), leaving many aspects of the brief Brest system of international relations ignored.

To fill this gap, the panel will invite researchers to address the following questions: How did the policy of the Central Powers develop in the context of the Brest Peace Conference? What was the reaction of revolutionary Russia to the end of war on the Eastern Front? How did the peace affect the national movements of Central Europe? What did the Entente undertake in response to separate treaties of its former allies (Russia, Ukraine and Romania)?

The working languages of the panel are English, Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian.

The International Congress of Belarusian Studies is one of the largest event in the academic life of Belarusian researchers in Social and Human sciences, attracting a number of foreign colleagues and gathering up to 500 participants.

CfP: ESSHC 2018 Session: Digitising visitor encounters with warfare

European Social Science History Conference 2018 (Queen’s University, Belfast, April 4-7, 2018)
Session title: Digitising visitor encounters with warfare
Session Organisers: Dr Ria Dunkley, University of Glasgow and Laurie Slegtenhorst MA, Erasmus University Rotterdam

War has been a popular tourist attraction for centuries (Seaton, 1996), while throughout the 20th-century, warfare and allied memorabilia arguably constituted the world’s largest tourist attraction (Smith, 1996). This situation shows little sign of abating within the present day, when visitation of sites such as the Battlefields of Culloden (UK) and those associated with World War I and II continues to increases (Dunkley, 2011). Yet, for many visitors, understanding the events that have occurred at historical places can be difficult. This is particularly the case for ancient battle sites, where historical relics associated with the event are no longer visible. Due to the increase centrality of visual representations in present day society, publics often desire affective connection to the past, involving tacit involvement with a history that can be touched, heard and smelt, as well as seen (Landsberg, 2015). Digital tools, such as apps, virtual reality, augmented reality and 3D animation arguably provide visitors with totalising, immersive experiences of history and enable an appreciation of the multiple layers of history at war-related sites. Yet, despite a recent proliferation in the number of sites harnessing digital technology to augment the visitor experience, little research has focused upon the way such sites are experienced by the visitors who use these digital tools.

This session seeks papers that explore how different types of visitors engage with history at war-related sites in diverse ways. Questions that will be central to the session include: how do visitors use digital tools to navigate sites of war?; how is the experience history enhanced through digital mediation?; do digital tools engage visitors with history at a deeper, more critical level?; can digital technology enhance understandings of complex historical events? and; is it possible to cater to the needs of homogenous groups of visitors (including, school children, special interest tourists, serendipitous visitors, veterans, survivors and victims’ relatives) through harnessing digital technology?

Proposed research topics include, but are not limited to:

Visitor experiences of using digital technology to navigate sites associate with war (including sites of actual events, as well as museums, memorials and sites of internment);
The significance of memory and pre-conceptions to how digital representations are engaged with;
The representation of divergent identities within digital applications developed for war-related sites (including representations of gender, class and race);
The potentials of digitisation of war-related sites for formal and informal learning (particularly in terms of democracy education);
Innovative methodologies for understanding how the visitor experience is mediated by digital technology at war-related sites.

Presentations should be approximately twenty minutes in length. Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to Laurie Slegtenhorst (slegtenhorst@eshcc.eur.nl) and Ria Dunkley (ria.dunkley@glasgow.ac.uk) by April, 23, 2017. Submissions should also include: Author name, institutional affiliation, e-mail and mailing address. Please do also get in touch with any questions, or to discuss alternative forms of presentation.

For more information on the conference, please visit: https://esshc.socialhistory.org/

CfP: Their Past, Their Memory? King’s College, London, 15 Sept, 2017

King’s College London, 15 September 2017

A one-day interdisciplinary workshop hosted at King’s College, London as part of the AHRC-funded Teaching and Learning War Research Network to explore young people’s engagement with and receptivity to the cultural memory messages of the two world wars from an international comparative perspective. We welcome abstract submissions from academic researchers and educational practitioners in schools, museums, non-profit organisations, archives and heritage organisations.

The event will be structured around short presentations of no more than 15 minutes ensuring maximum time for group discussion.

General queries and abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to Catriona Pennell (C.L.Pennell@exeter.ac.uk) by 9 June 2017. Please include your name, organisation/institution and contact email in the abstract.

While the workshop is free to attend for all, the AHRC is also providing fifteen travel bursaries of up to £100pp for those travelling from outside the Greater London area – please indicate on your abstract/in your email whether you would like to be considered for the bursary. Priority will be given to PGRs, ECRs, and representatives of non-academic institutions/organisations.

Download call for papers: Their Past, Their Memory_CfP

CfP: World War 100: A Centennial Symposium

The Wisconsin World War I Centennial Commission is pleased to announce a call for papers for a two-day international conference, World War 100: A Centennial Symposium. Marking the centenary of the entry of the United States into the war, this conference brings together scholars from myriad fields to examine the legacies of the war in its global, imperial, national, and local dimensions. We invite proposals on a broad range of topics on the cultural, social, and political dimensions of the conflict and from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives. We particularly encourage papers that are interpretive in nature and that engage the numerous ways in which the war has continued to inform global and local experiences in the past century. Special programming will be dedicated to the war’s effects on Wisconsin and Wisconsin’s contributions to the war.

The conference will take place on the weekend of October 27-28, 2017, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Featured speakers include Bruno Cabanes (Ohio State University), Holly Case (Brown University), Jennifer Keene (Chapman University), and Michael Neiberg (Army War College). Limited travel support, particularly for graduate students, may become available at a later date.

No later than May 1st, please send a title, a brief description of the paper (up to 250 words), and a two-page vitae to: ww100@lists.wisc.edu. Panel and roundtable proposals should include an additional rationale for the panel as a whole.

For further information about registration, hotel information, and submission of papers please go to http://bit.ly/ww100wi.

For other questions, contact sloreck@wisc.edu with the header line “WW100 information request”

CfP: First World War in the Indian Context: International Seminar

January/ February 2018

The St Aloysius College (Mangalore, Karnataka, India) plans to organize a two-day international seminar on the theme The First World War in the Indian Context and invites scholars in Humanities, Arts, Social Sciences and in related fields to participate.

The Theme and the Context
It is 100 years since the First World War took place. As all of us know, though the Great War was the result of complex political developments of Europe, it had large influence on Indian society, economy and political life. It was mainly due to the fact that India was a colony of the British. The British too wanted the cooperation of Indians. Mahatma Gandhi who had returned to India after his African sojourn during the war had encouraged Indians to join the British forces. Indians had immensely contributed to the British war efforts in the form of men and ammunitions as well as financial resources.

Important information
Those intending to present papers can contact the Chief Coordinator at the earliest opportunity. They can also send their papers before 30th November 2017 (along with an abstract). The details are given below. International and invited scholars will be offered an honorarium. A detailed brochure with sub-themes would be sent to those who are participating and presenting the papers.

The exact date of the seminar, travel and accommodation details will be intimated well in advance. It will be our pleasure to welcome you at St Aloysius College (Autonomous) campus at Mangalore in January/ February 2018.

For further details kindly contact:
Chief Coordinator: Dr Vishanz Pinto, Dean, Faculty of Arts, St Aloysius College (Autonomous), Mangalore-575003, Karnataka, India
Phone: + 91 9480289560
Email: vishanzpinto@yahoo.com
Asst. Coordinator: Dr Denis Fernandes, IQAC Coordinator, St Aloysius College (Autonomous), Mangalore-575003, Karnataka, India.

Further information here.

CfP: Why Remember? Memory and Forgetting in Times of War and Its Aftermath

3-Day Conference in Sarajevo, Bosnia, June 30th, July 1st, July 2nd 2017

Sponsored by PARC University of the Arts, London; Salem State University,
Massachusetts, USA; WARM Festival, Sarajevo, Bosnia

Keynote Speakers include:
Simon Norfolk, photographer, and Vladimir Miladinović, artist.

In his book In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and Its Ironies, David Rieff offers a persuasive challenge as to whether the age-long “consensus that it is moral to remember, immoral to forget” still stands in our contemporary era. What should we remember, what should we forget, and why? Do we need to reconfigure the way that we think about memory and its potential impact on issues such as reconciliation and healing in the wake of war? Is memory impotent as a social, political, or aesthetic tool? Rieff’s questions appear more pertinent than ever as wars and conflicts continue to rage in many parts of the world with no end in sight.

These questions of memory (and forgetting) are intensely political and have far-reaching consequences. This conference will engage with difficult and troubling questions around the value and nature of memory such as how do they reverberate in the context of postwar societies, post-conflict reconciliation, prevention, questions of memory and past events? Does memory discourse help us push the borders of how the concept of memory is currently being configured and applied? To what extent do we remember the past and how do we choose what to remember and why we remember? How could and should (consciously and unconsciously) memory processes shape the present and future? How might public institutions (such as museums and other heritage sites that support education/awareness) deal with the past? What is the difference between commemoration and memorialization? Where do they intersect and how might they impact the process of reconciliation and prevention? How can art function as a site of the aesthetic interpretation of the past?

We seek papers from a wide-range of historical and geographical spaces that address the discursive limits of contemporary memory studies, particularly drawing on these areas of study:

• Film/media studies
• Museum studies/objects/ New Materialism
• Visual arts
• Literature/Narrative
• Music/Performance
• Necropolitics/Forensics/Anthropology
• Politics and aesthetics
**Interdisciplinary approaches to memory and remembrance studies are welcome.

There will be two styles of presentations: more formal papers of 20-25 minutes and workshop idea papers of 10-15 minutes. We welcome submissions from artists, early career researchers and post-docs as well as established scholars. We encourage applications from a range of academics, current PhD students, especially those outside of Western European institutions. All papers will be delivered in English.

Paper proposals should include:
• author name(s), affiliation(s) and contact email,
• paper title,
• a paper abstract (200 words max),
• and short bio (200 words max).

Please clearly indicate whether you are submitting formal paper or a workshop idea paper.

This academic conference is linked to the Art and Reconciliation AHRC funded research project currently being undertaken by The University of the Arts London, King’s College War studies Department, and the LSE. The research is under the auspices of the PACCS Conflict Programme.

It is also part of the larger WARM festival, which takes place in Sarajevo, Bosnia each summer, and “is dedicated to war reporting, war art, war memory. WARM is bringing together people – journalists, artists, historians, researchers, activists – with a common passion for ‘telling the story with excellence and integrity’.” See this link for more information: http://www.warmfoundation.org

Registration cost: 150 Euros.

Concessionary rates are available for faculty applying from non-EU, non-US institutions, and for those who can present a case for reduced fees. Information about hostels and hotels will be provided for participants.

Please submit your proposals no later than March 17th, 2017 to why.remember.conference@gmail.com.

Decisions will be made by March 31st, 2017.

The conference is supported by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Salem State University, Massachusetts, and the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at the University of the Arts London.

Contact Info:
why.remember.conference@gmail.com (e-mails get delivered to Stephanie Young and Paul Lowe, the organisers).
Further information: admir.jugo@durham.ac.uk

Also:
contact@warmfoundation.org
www.warmfoundation.org