Book review: Lawrence of Arabia’s War: The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WW1, by Neil Faulkner.

The story of the young war hero has historically captivated Western readers for decades. However, in the recent past, there have been calls to engage more deeply with the lesser-known histories and broader participants in the First World War. In this context, Sneha Reddy argues that Faulkner’s book goes in the other direction and shifts the spotlight back to Lawrence by making him the central focus of his study. Nonetheless, she adds, for a book that is a result of a ten-year endeavour, ending in 2014, to study modern conflict archaeology as part of the Great Arab Revolt Project, it is uniquely placed.

Author: Sneha Reddy is a PhD student at the School of International Relations in the University of St Andrews. Her research focuses on French North African and British Indian soldiers in the First World War in the Middle East.

Review on publisher’s site here
Author’s e-print link
Article DOI

Online talk: ‘Two-thirds of a Life: The Challenge of Writing about T.E. Lawrence’

Jeremy Wilson, who has written extensively on the life and letters of T.E. Lawrence, including Lawrence of Arabia: The Authorized Biography of T.E. Lawrence, gave a lecture in May 2015 at the Institut d’Etudes Avancées in Paris. A recording of the lecture is available here.

Workshop – Translating World War One: The Case of T. E. Lawrence

Workshop organised by Mary Bryden, fellow at the Paris IAS

Date et heure:
12/05/2015 – 09:30 – 17:30

Lieu: Institut d’études avancées de Paris, 17 quai d’Anjou, 75004 Paris

During the current Centenary of the First World War, we are commemorating the first mass industrialised war. If the number of victims was unprecedented, so too was the manner in which this quickly became a literary war. Amongst those caught up in the conflict were many who wished to describe this radical break with normality. Some of these narrations appeared in the course of the conflict itself, while others formed part of the second wave of war literature, between 1929 and 1930. The prevalent literary model is that of the muddy fields and trenches of the Western Front. However, this journée d’étude will concentrate upon the Middle Eastern Front and, in particular, on the person of T. E. Lawrence, whose war book Seven Pillars of Wisdom describes his participation in the Arab Revolt from 1916 to 1918.

Further information, programme and registration.