CFP: 54th Annual CompLit Conference: “Cultural Memory and Trauma: Literary and Visual Representations”

The Comparative World Literature Program at California State University, Long Beach, invites abstracts for presentations at its 54th annual conference in Long Beach, California. This year we would like participants to consider the relationship between trauma and memory, both individual and collective memory and their intersections, within a variety of disciplinary contexts. How is a cultural memory formed, or how do cultures remember the past? How do different voices/media contribute to constructing a cultural memory? How does the act of commemorating trauma affect or even alter the way that an experience is remembered?

We invite papers on the following topics, which can include but are not limited to:

between memory and history: cultural memory as representation
in tension with the past: absence and memory
embodied memory: the body as container and conveyer of memory
the role of objects in preserving cultural memory
cultural memory, trauma, and ritual: the role of religion
individual experience and cultural memory: post-colonial approaches
transmitting traumatic memories: the role of culture
the female/trans/queer/etc. body as a carrier of memory
the phenomenon of Holocaust deniers / deniers in general: contesting cultural memory
testimonials / bearing witness: the importance of oral tradition within cultural memory
cultural cognition: how cultural values shape risk perception
the role of culture in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
dealing with trauma through comedy & mediated memory

Proposals for 15-20 minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined, and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 300 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by January 31, 2019. Please submit abstracts as a Word document as an email attachment to comparativeworldliterature@gmail.com. Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. The conference committee will review all proposals, with accepted papers receiving notification by February 21, 2019.

CfP: Fourteenth annual symposium on the social history of military technology

The 14th Annual Symposium of the Social History of Military Technology (SSHMT) will be scheduled as part of the program for the 46th Conference of the International Committee for the History of Technology (ICOHTEC), Katowice, Poland, 22–27 July 2019.

SSHMT seeks papers about: (1) representations of weapons as well as weapons themselves, about ideas as well as hardware, about organization as well as materiel; (2) ways in which social class, race, gender, culture, economics, politics, or other extra-military factors have influenced and been influenced by the invention, r&d, diffusion, or use of weapons or other military technologies; (3) the roles that military technologies play in shaping and reshaping the relationships of soldiers to other soldiers; soldiers to military, political, and social institutions; and military institutions to other social institutions, most notably political and economic; and/or (4) historiographical or museological topics that discuss how military technology has been analyzed, interpreted, and understood in other fields, other cultures, and other times. Pre-modern and non-Western topics are particularly welcome.

Papers may be presented in English, French, German, Spanish, or Russian, but all proposals must be submitted in English. Proposals must include a short descriptive title of the paper, an abstract (maximum 300 words), and a short CV (maximum 1 page). Send your proposal to Bart Hacker at: <barthacker60@gmail.com>, no later than 10 January 2019, but earlier is better.

CfP: Con-IH 19 | Militarization: Methods, Approaches, & New Directions

Harvard University, March 28th-29th, 2019

The organizing committee for the Harvard Graduate Student Conference on International History (Con-IH) invites graduate students to submit proposals for its nineteenth annual conference. This year’s theme is Militarization: Methods, Approaches, and New Directions. The conference will take place at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts on March 28-29th, 2019.

Con-IH is looking for submissions on a broad range of topics relating to militaries, militarism, militancy, and militarization in global and international history. Processes of militarization and armed conflict have produced destructive violence, created new international and regional networks, and transformed social, cultural, and economic relations. Con-IH seeks to discuss cutting-edge studies that take up the subject of militarization beyond a single nation’s history to encompass international, regional, imperial and global historical contexts.

We welcome submissions that address one or more of the following themes, but the list is only suggestive:

Race and Indigeneity
Gender and Sexuality
Foreign Policy, Diplomacy, and World Affairs
Economics, Labor, and Class
Environments and Ecologies
Memory and Commemoration
Warfare and Occupation
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Material Culture and Consumption
Refugees, Displacement, and Migration
Boundaries, Bases, and (Home)Fronts

Accepted papers will be grouped for presentation within three or four panels each composed of graduate students and one faculty commentator for each presenter. Participation in Con-IH presents an unparalleled opportunity to engage in lively and lengthy discussions with an emerging cohort of researchers-in-training from around the world, as well as with faculty from Harvard and elsewhere.

Graduate students interested in participating in the conference should submit a 300-word proposal and one-page Curriculum Vitae in a single PDF document to conih@fas.harvard.edu. Please title your submission “Lastname_ShortTitle.” Proposals must be received by November 15, 2018, in order to be considered. We anticipate being able to reimburse reasonable travel and lodging expenses for all participants. As the date approaches, additional information will be posted on the conference website.

2019-2020 Lemelson Center Fellowships and Travel Grants

Fellowships and Travel Grants from the Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center
Apps Due: 1 November 2018

Through its fellowships and travel grants, the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation supports research projects that present creative approaches to the study of invention and innovation in American society. Projects may include (but are not limited to) historical research and documentation projects resulting in dissertations, publications, exhibitions, educational initiatives, documentary films, or other multimedia products.

Our programs provide access to the expertise of the Institution’s research staff and the vast invention and technology collections of the National Museum of American History (NMAH). The NMAH Archives Center documents both individuals and firms across a range of time periods and subject areas. Representative collections include the Western Union Telegraph Company Records, ca. 1840-1994 and the Earl S. Tupper Papers, documenting Tupper, and his invention, Tupperware. In addition, the NMAH Library offers long runs of historical technology serials like Scientific American and American Machinist, and the American Trade Literature collection, which includes 300,000 catalogs, technical manuals, and advertising brochures for some 30,000 firms, primarily from 1880-1945. For a comprehensive catalog of objects, manuscripts, images and research materials available at the NMAH (and other Smithsonian units), see http://www.collections.si.edu/.

The Arthur Molella Distinguished Fellowship supports the work of an experienced author or senior scholar (associate/full/emeritus professor level or equivalent) from the history of technology, science and technology studies, business history, museum studies, STEAM education, or an allied field. The specific arrangement is flexible: the Molella Fellow may use the funds as a sabbatical supplement; for several short-duration visits; for a single residency focused on research and writing; or for a series of lectures leading to a major publication. The stipend is $35,000. Funds may be used flexibly to support travel for several short-term visits, living expenses for longer residences up to six months, and related research expenses; dates are flexible. Applications are due November 1, 2018. For application procedures and additional information, see http://invention.si.edu/arthur-molella-distinguished-fellowship. Applicants may wish to consult with the fellowship coordinator before submitting a proposal; contact historian Eric S. Hintz, PhD at +1 202-633-3734 or hintze@si.edu.

The Lemelson Center Fellowship Program annually awards 2 to 3 fellowships to pre-doctoral graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and other professionals who have completed advanced training. Fellows are expected to reside in the Washington, D.C. area, to participate in the Center’s activities, and to make a presentation of their work to colleagues at the museum. Fellowship tenure is based upon the applicants’ stated needs (and available funding) up to a maximum of ten weeks. Stipends will be $750/week for pre-doctoral fellows and $1,000/week for post-doctoral and professional fellows. Applications are due November 1, 2018. For application procedures and additional information, see http://invention.si.edu/lemelson-center-fellowship-program. Researchers may wish to consult with the fellowship coordinator before submitting a proposal; contact historian Eric S. Hintz, PhD at +1 202-633-3734 or hintze@si.edu.

The Lemelson Center Travel to Collections Award Program annually awards 3 to 4 short-term travel grants to encourage the use of its invention-related collections. Awards are $150 per day for a maximum of 10 business days and may be used to cover transportation, living, and reproduction expenses; they are intended only for applicants who reside or attend school beyond commuting distance of the NMAH. Applications are due November 1, 2018. See http://invention.si.edu/lemelson-center-travel-collections-awards for application procedures and additional information. Researchers may wish to consult with the travel award coordinator before submitting a proposal; contact archivist Alison Oswald at +1 202-633-3726 or oswalda@si.edu.

CfP: The War Correspondent in the Latin countries : 1918-1939

International Conference, France – Université d’Angers, May 9-10, 2019
Co-organized with Sorbonne Université and Université Savoie Mont Blanc

What are the foundations and the ideological, political, sociocultural and/or aesthetic and literary expressions which compose the multifaceted figure of the war correspondent during the Interwar Period, particularly in the Latin area – principally Italy, France, Spain, Portugal and their colonies, and Latin America – simultaneously a theater of conflicts and a supplier of correspondents for the rest of the world? How does the figure of a war correspondent differ from that of travel writers ? And to what extent are these two figures comparable or even identical? What were the impacts of the intermediate conflicts of the years 1918-1939 on the renewal of the role and function of war correspondents? And finally, bearing in mind that most of the above-mentioned conflicts were born as consequences of the imperial aims of antiparliamentary regimes with revolutionary designs (colonial wars or anti-colonial resistances, the internationalization of the red, black or brown revolutions, geopolitical tensions between democracies and totalitarian or authoritarian regimes, etc.), could one argue that the war correspondents of this transitional period were the product of these civilizational upheavals; and more particularly, to what extent were they the forerunners of the apprehended disaster of the Second World War, and the Spanish Civil War, – generally considered as its « dress rehearsal »? Although limited to Italy, France, Spain, Portugal (and their colonies) and Latin America, the papers can, of course, explore the question of war correspondents from other geographical areas as well (such as Germany, Great Britain, United States, Soviet Union, etc.), provided they operate within the Latin area.

The abstracts (3000 characters, including blank spaces: French, Italian, English and Spanish as reference languages) must be sent before 15 October 2018 to the following conference organizers : Manuelle Peloille (Université d’Angers), Olivier Dard (Université Paris Sorbonne : Sorbonne Université/Labex EHNE) and Emmanuel Mattiato (Université Savoie Mont Blanc : LLSETI – EA3706) :

manuelle.peloille@univ-angers.fr
olivierdard@orange.fr
emmanuel.mattiato@univ-smb.fr

Further information here.

Europeana Research Grants: Call for Project Proposals on the First World War

The Europeana Foundation manages Europeana, the digital platform for cultural heritage funded by the European Commission. It addresses its activities to researchers, research and cultural institutions, and e-infrastructures through Europeana Research.

On an annual basis since 2016, Europeana Research has supported early-career scholars in the Humanities undertaking innovative research projects that reuse openly licensed Europeana sources and digital tools. They can benefit from up to 8,000 Euros per project.

This year’s call focuses on the First World War and aims to highlight the relevance of the Europeana 1914-18 Collection for research.

Contact Email: EuropeanaResearchGrants@Europeana.eu
Further information: https://pro.europeana.eu/post/research-grants-programme-2018-call-for-submissions-open

CfP: Politics of Memory and Trauma

ICAS 11: Politics of Memory and Trauma
16 – 19 July 2019
Leiden University

The LDE Centre for Global Heritage and Development will organize a panel on the “Contested Heritage and the Politics of Memory and Trauma” as part of the International Convention of Asia Scholars, which will be organized at Leiden University from 16 – 19 July 2019. The panel intends to discuss the notion of “contested heritage”, in light of the politics of memory and trauma.

Wars and conflicts have a direct impact on the tangible environment. Military architectures, war ruins, wrecks and monumental memorials all together form what is known as conflict heritage. In Asia, a significant share of conflict heritage remains absent from the heritage discourse. This may be attributed to many reasons, of which: the lack of a proper recognition of this specific category of heritage. Second, the contested nature of the heritage prevent governments from touching upon the subject, especially in the cases where human causalities were involved. Third, the conflict of interests which results from the economic value of this heritage. For instance, the collection of rare types of aircraft wreckage or the activities carried by metal salvagers. What can we do to safeguard this type of heritage from its biggest threat: oblivion?

With this session we hope to raise awareness on this particular category of heritage, especially with policy makers.

While we welcome all contributions that are relevant to the theme of the panel, we particularly encourage contributions that address the following topics:

. New theoretical approaches to defining conflict heritage, with respect to the Asian context.
. Case studies from Asia that investigates the politics and dynamics of memory that surrounds contested heritage

Prospective participants may send their abstracts (max. 300 words) and brief bios to Professor Carola Hein at c.m.hein@tudelft.nl and John Hanna j.m.k.k.hanna@tudelft.nl by 01 October 2018.

For any inquiries about the panel and the conference, please write to c.m.hein@tudelft.nl

For further information on the conference, see here.