CfP: To cease fire, to cease hostilities? Since modern times to the present day

The Defense Historical Service and the Zentrum für Militärgeschichte und Sozialwissenschaften der Bundeswehr, the Institute of War and Peace Studies (IHMC-UMR 8066, Paris 1-Sorbonne) are organizing on the 27th and 28th November 2018 an international symposium entitled “To cease fire, to cease hostilities? Since modern times to the present day.”

Over the last few years, the historiography of military history has benefited from a profound renewal of ideas, objects and methods in the wake of John Keegan’s works. Despite a growing interest in the surrender phenomenon (P. Vo-Ha) or in the experience of war captivity (F. Théofilakis, F. Cochet) and more generally in the fate of the vanquished (C. Defrance, C. Horel and F.-X. Nérard), the analysis of the end of hostilities still remains a blind spot. However, the organizers of the current conference are convinced that this problem is a particularly fertile prism through which the war object should be examined: The way we stop fighting says much about how the war is thought and waged.

Papers can be submitted in French or English.
Languages for the symposium will be French and English.
Please send us a 500-word abstract and a short bio by July 1st, 2018. Accepted speakers will be notified by July 15th, 2018.

The organizers of the symposium will bear the costs of:
– Travelling tickets, accommodations and catering for non-Parisians speakers
– Midday lunches

Please direct questions and submissions to: colloque.ceasefire@gmail.com
Full call for papers: CFP To cease fire

CfP: From the “New Republic” to the Spanish Flu: the Azores and the Armistice

World War 1 Congress
Faial Theatre, Horta, Faial, Azores, 18-20 October 2018
Azores Military Museum, Ponta Delgada, São Miguel, Azores, 15-17 November 2018

Sidónio Pais died on December 14, 1918, murdered in Lisbon. As a republican, he would successively occupy the positions of deputy, senator, minister and ambassador, returning to Portugal when the First World War was already predicted. In power by the conspiracy that established the “New Republic” (1917-18), he would lead a confederation of disgruntled republicans, monarchists, clericals and anti-war forces, and legitimize the presidency by elections, exercising a mixed power of authoritarianism and populism. His homicide left the country in great political, economic and social instability, aggravated by the Spanish flu, the Influenza A virus.

In the Azores, the year of 1918 was marked by the war in the sea; the Spanish Flu; the Azores Detachment of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and the High Commissar of the Republic, General Simas Machado, was sent by the President of the Republic to control the civil, military and diplomatic areas in the archipelago. To this scenario were added the war in the sea, the TSF and submarine cables and the communication of the Armistice to North America; a German POW in Terceira island and a deep trade crisis, with big social misery, promoted in many cases by the action of hoarders.

This meeting aims to analyze the last year of World War I, with particular emphasis on the Azores in its relationship with the Atlantic, belligerence, economic crisis, communications and Atlantic ports, and international affairs with Sidonism and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Likewise, 1918 also marks a year of profound reflection about the hygienic-sanitary conditions, and is even a starting point for the study of war traumas or morpho-functional sciences / biomedical engineering, to which we can ally the relevance of the female activism, with some echoes in the Azores.

The organizing committee calls for proposals that address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

The maritime and terrestrial dimension of the involvement of the Azores in World War I;
The naval and submarine war;
The Atlantic and telecommunications during the Great War;
The maritime connections in the Trenches War, or in the colonies;
The Sidonism and the High Commissioner of the Republic for the Azores;
Health services, health conditions and the Spanish Flu;
The Armistice and the return to normality;
Women’s Emancipation.

Submission deadline: 17 July 2018
Further information here.
Download CfP: 2018-10-18_Azores-Armistice_CFP

Submission process: Please send your identification (name, institutional affiliation and mail address), Paper title, place of preference (Horta/Ponta Delgada), Abstract (maximum 700 words), and academic CV (1 page) via mail to: azoreswar@gmail.com

Working languages: English, Portuguese (no simultaneous interpretation is available).

Organising committee:
Ana Paula Pires (IHC – NOVA FCSH and Stanford University)
Rita Nunes (Comité Olímpico de Portugal and IHC – NOVA FCSH)
Sérgio Rezendes (IHC – NOVA FCSH)
Manuel Marchã (Museu Militar dos Açores)
Carlos Lobão (Escola Secundária Manuel de Arriaga /CHAM Açores)

Scientific committee:
António Paulo Duarte (IDN and IHC – NOVA FCSH)
Carolina Garcìa Sanz (Universidad de Sevilha)
Filipe Ribeiro de Meneses (University of Maynooth)
Luís Manuel Vieira de Andrade (Universidade dos Açores)
Maria Inès Tato (CONICET and Universidad de Buenos Aires)

CfP: America in the Trenches: A centennial exploration of America’s involvement in the Great War

This Call for Papers is for a conference on WWI at CSU Bakersfield, on Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018.

We invite proposals for either 3-paper panels or an individual 20-minute research presentation (that is, a roughly 10-page paper) from established and emerging scholars, as well as from graduate and advanced undergraduate students. These proposals may come from diverse disciplines, as well as those that take an interdisciplinary perspective. We plan to publish selected conference papers digitally. For more information about the conference, visit http://phi.csub.edu, or follow us on Facebook @CSUB Public History Institute.

Papers may be on WWI itself or on the many ripple effects of the war. Examples include, but are not limited to, art, poetry, music, theater, health issues, new technology, existential angst, the role of women, propaganda, political upheaval, religious reactions, the use of animals in war, life on the home front, and so much more.

The conference will include breakfast and lunch, plus an afternoon keynote address by Dr. Diane M.T. North, drawn from her forthcoming book: California at War: The State and the People during World War I (University of Kansas Press, 2018).

Please email abstracts of roughly 200 words, along with a one-page c.v., to Prof. Miriam Raub Vivian at mvivian@csub.edu by Friday, August 10, 2018. Full paper submissions will be due via email by Monday, Oct. 1.

Conference registration, which is $40 per person, is payable online, and due by Monday, October 1, at http://phi.csub.edu.

CfP: Motherhood, Loss and the First World War

Senate House, London
5 – 6 September 2018

The extraordinary death tolls suffered on the fighting fronts of the First World War gave rise to unprecedented levels of loss for individuals and communities across Europe and the wider world. Indeed, bereavement became so widespread during the conflict that it can rightly be regarded as one of the defining experiences of the war. Historians have had relatively little to say about wartime loss, however, and the bereaved have not been widely acknowledged or remembered during the centenary commemorations of the conflict.

In order to shed light on this much-overlooked theme, a conference will be held at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London on 5 and 6 September that will bring historians and community groups together to explore maternal bereavement as a result of the war, an experience that was understood to be particularly painful and difficult to come to terms with. The conference will be held as part of an ongoing community project, Motherhood, Loss and the First World War, funded by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and led by Big Ideas, the London Centre for Public History and the Institute of Historical Research.

Proposals for papers on relevant themes in the form of 400-word abstracts should be sent to edward.madigan@rhul.ac.uk by 20 June 2018.

Download poster: CFP Motherhood Loss and the First World War

CfP: From War to Welfare: Global Perspectives since the Nineteenth Century

Special Issue of Contemporanea

A large body of scholarship has shown how the experience of the two world wars in the twentieth century was a crucial catalyst for the creation of modern welfare states. However, war’s role in social legislation has yet to be conceptualized more fully. In mainstream comparative literature on the welfare state, war is typically considered a rare, anomalous occurrence that is conceived as a kind of exogenous shock, as an ‘abnormal event’, a ‘black swan’ emergency or a critical juncture. In this way, war has constituted a gray zone in the history of the welfare state. By contrast, the question of the origins and development of social protection systems has been viewed primarily in relation to processes of modernization or as an instrument for managing social conflict.

Nonetheless, recent studies of different national contexts have shown the fruitfulness of an approach that looks at the welfare state through the interpretative paradigm of the welfare-warfare link (for example: Scheidel 2017; Obinger–Petersen 2015; Castle 2010). Moreover, recent research has also highlighted how wartime conflicts involved planning processes that cast long shadows over the subsequent peacetime. Antecedent conditions and long-term social policy repercussions of war in postconflict periods must therefore be carefully analyzed, and from comparative, connective and global perspectives, in order to highlight the broader ways in which war and welfare have intersected in the past and over time.

This special issue of Contemporanea aims to reflect on the multifaceted causal links between war and the development of welfare states, which are conceived here broadly to include not only national social legislation but also the myriad of social programmes that flourished in the wake of war. We invite proposals that examine the welfare-warfare nexus over more than two centuries (19th-20th) and on a wide variety of geographic and political contexts (among them also colonial and post–colonial contexts). In particular, Contemporanea would welcome proposals focusing on the following topics as they relate to the welfare-warfare nexus:

Questions related to gender, sexuality and the family
Tax systems and equality
Public health and assistance
Risk and social insurance
Mass conscription
Labour legislation
And other topics that highlight how conflicts have served (or not served) as accelerators in the national and transnational debates on approaches to social protection

The proposals (600 words maximum) accompanied by a brief (2-page max) CV should be sent by August 15, 2018 to the editors Julia Moses (j.moses@sheffield.ac.uk), Ilaria Pavan (ilaria.pavan@sns.it) and Chiara Giorgi (mariachiara.giorgi@unipi.it) along with a CC to the editorial secretary (contemporanea@mulino.it). Responses will be sent by e-mail by September 30, 2018, and the selected essays must be submitted in their final form by February 28, 2019. All manuscripts will be refereed through a peer-review process (double blind). The special issue will be published by Summer 2020. Please note that all manuscripts should be submitted in English.

Contemporanea publishes contributions in Italian and English. For more information about the journal: http://www.mulino.it/edizioni/riviste/issn/1127-3070#presentazione. Contemporanea is indexed by: ISI Web of Science (Art & Humanities Citation Index), Scopus Bibliographic Database, Historical Abstracts, America: History and Life, Articoli italiani di periodici accademici (AIDA), Journal Seek, Essper, Bibliografia storica nazionale, Catalogo italiano dei periodici (ACNP), and Google Scholar.

CfP: Imperial Implosions: World War I and its Global Implications

California State University at Channel Islands, Camarillo, California, and the History Department are pleased to announce that it will host a conference commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I on November 8th and 9th, 2018. The focus of the conference is Imperial Implosions: The Global Implications of World War I. We are looking for papers dealing with any aspect of the World War I in Asia, Africa, America, Europe, Latin America or elsewhere where there were significant historical implications and reverberations.

Featured speakers at the conference will be Professor Sean McMeekin of Bard College and the author of The Russian Revolution (2017) and The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution and the Making of the Modern Middle East (2015) and Professor Pria Satia, of Stanford University and the author of Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution (2018) and The Great War and the Cultural Foundations of Britain’s Covert Empire in the Middle East (2008)

Prospective presenters and participants should send a 350 word maximum proposal to either P. Scott Corbett, scott.corbett@csuci.edu or Michael Powelson michael.powelson@csuci.edu by September 3, 2018 with the final version of papers due September 14, 2018.

There is no registration fee for faculty or student presenters and no fee for student attendees.

Details about registration, travel, and accommodations can be obtained from P. Scott Corbett, scott.corbett@csuci.edu, (805) 437-8970 or (805) 267-6131.

CfP: State of Emergency: Architecture, Urbanism, and World War One, SAH, Providence, 2019

72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians
April 24-28, 2019 / Providence, Rhode Island

CFP: State of Emergency: Architecture, Urbanism, and World War One
Session Chairs: Erin Sassin, Middlebury College, and Sophie Hochhäusl, Harvard University

“Far greater than the infamy of war is that of men who want to forget that it ever took place, although they exulted in it at the time,” wrote Austrian journalist Karl Kraus in The Last Days of Mankind, revealing humanity’s abyss on the eve of World War I. With the centennial of the conclusion of the First World War approaching, we seek to reassess what this cataclysmic global conflict meant for architecture and urbanism from a human, social, and economic perspective.

Histories of design have often emphasized wartime advances in mechanization and standardization that opened new fields of inquiry in the aftermath of WWI and blurred the meaning of what constituted architecture. Yet, the war also prompted the rapid development of military-architectural knowledge impacting civilian populations at great human cost. As mechanized trench warfare came to the brink of collapse, hyper-development was accompanied by the re-emergence of systems of underdevelopment, including barter and subsistence economies, as well as mobile kitchens, field railways, and do-it-yourself objects made in the state of emergency.

In this session, we seek to imbed the formation of architectural networks and institutions (such as the Glass Chain or Vkhutemas) in broader histories of wartime architectural production advanced by governments, institutions, organizations, or citizens in order to interrogate the complex and often violent relationship between front and home front. We particularly welcome papers that address regions impacted by WWI beyond Western Europe analyzing how architectural agents and institutions mitigated, exacerbated, or actively resisted complicity in this human tragedy. We seek contributions that consider the impact of the ephemeral and the creation of makeshift architecture by women and children in the transformation of wartime urbanism. Finally, we encourage projects that engage economic theories of the war and relate them to post-war debates on cooperation, socialization, and democracy.

The 72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians will take place on April 24-28, 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island. Submission of abstracts begins on April 3, 2018. Applicants will submit a 300-word abstract and CV through the online portal of the Society of Architectural Historians. Please do not send these materials directly to the panel co-chairs. Submission of proposals to the SAH online portal closes at 11:59 on June 5, 2018.